porcupine tree Archive

Prepare Yourself: Porcupine Tree’s ‘The Sky Moves Sideways’ at 25 (Part 2)

Continued from Part One … The nature of the music on The Sky Moves Sideways gives bassist Colin Edwin comparatively little to do as well: while he’s an instrumentalist of the first order, there’s often not a great deal in Wilson’s compositions here that lends itself to low-end fireworks. While that would change significantly on

Prepare Yourself: Porcupine Tree’s ‘The Sky Moves Sideways’ at 25 (Part 1)

Today, Steven Wilson is widely known –and acclaimed – as one of the busiest and most creative figures in music. Though he came to wider notice as a kind of progressive rock hero, helming remix/remaster projects for some of prog’s most beloved albums, he has always been about much more than art rock. His muse

Stranger by the Minute: Porcupine Tree’s ‘Stupid Dream’ at 20

Porcupine Tree began as a ruse; Steven Wilson concocted a backstory for a fictitious band. But the prodigiously talented multi-instrumentalist crafted music to go with the legend, and thus the “group” was born. After a string of albums made essentially at home alone, Wilson put together an actual group and began playing live dates. 1996’s

Album Mini-review: Steven Wilson — 4 1/2

File Next to: Radiohead, Opeth, Peter Gabriel Steven Wilson is possibly the busiest musician of the 21st century. Beyond his leadership of the now on-hiatus Porcupine Tree, he’s recorded and/or toured as (or as part of) Blackfield, No-man, Bass Communion, Storm Corrosion, and I.E.M. His remix work has improved on the already superb back catalogs of

Colin Edwin: Progressive in Any Language (Part 2)

Continued from Part One… Add to that challenge the expansiveness of the North American continent; the major markets – New York, Chicago, Los Angeles – are much farther apart than, say, Amsterdam and Berlin. “With Porcupine Tree, we did a lot with a sleeper bus,” Colin Edwin recalls. “But it was expensive. Especially when you

Colin Edwin: Progressive in Any Language (Part 1)

Some years ago in a print feature, I characterized Colin Edwin – then the bass player in Porcupine Tree – as “eternally bemused.” The music of Porcupine Tree is adventurous, aggressive, and melodic, but (it must be said) rarely what one would call…humorous. But through it all, the highly skilled bass guitarist wore an expression

DVD Review: Porcupine Tree – Anesthetize

From the opening menu of Porcupine Tree‘s latest concert DVD, 2010’s Anesthetize, it’s clear that the band is striking a decidedly different tone this go-round. It’s been four years since the band released Arriving Somewhere…, the live document of their 2005 tour. Back then, the band was promoting their then-current release Deadwing. Since that time

Album Review: Porcupine Tree — Lightbulb Sun

The 2008 reissue of Lightbulb Sun makes one of the rarest parts of the Porcupine Tree catalog readily available again. The group’s seventh album of studio material, Lightbulb Sun was originally released in 2000. Release was originally scheduled for 2007, in fact, as Steven Wilson told me during an interview. Porcupine Tree were selling Lightbulb