punk Archive

Album Review: Los Microwaves — The Birth of Techno

(Please visit yesterday’s post for some additional background on this release.) This playfully titled release features David Javelosa (on synth and vocals) along with Meg Brazill (on bass and vocals) plus drummer Todd “Rosa” Rosencrans (two other musicians appear on selected tracks). Side One features five studio tracks, none of which were included on the

Album Review: Baby Buddha — Music for Teenage Sects

My deep dive into the history of San Francisco-based indie record label 415 Records has yielded a book, Disturbing the Peace: 415 Records and the Rise of New Wave; it’s due out in a matter of days, and is available for pre-order now . And while I came into the project knowing a good bit

Album Review: Peter Bilt Group — Do It Up

One set of rhetorical questions that I encountered during my research for my new book was as collection of what-ifs. Of the nearly 30 bands that released music on the groundbreaking indie label 415 Records, few realized their full potential. One such case was the criminally underrated band Pearl Harbor and the Explosions. Fronted by

More from My Chat With Bob Mould (Part 2 of 2)

Continued from Part One… Your current rhythm section of Wurster and Narducy has now lasted longer, even, than Hüsker Dü did. What makes this trio work in ways that others may not have as well? There’s a couple simple answers. One is: we’re not yoked to each other 24/7. When we musicians are in full-time,

More from My Chat With Bob Mould (Part 1 of 2)

If I had a bucket list, a conversation with Bob Mould would have certainly been on it. And I realized that goal recently when I interviewed Mould (formerly of Sugar and Hüsker Dü but rightly appreciated today as a solo artist with a superb, deep and varied body of work under his own name) for

Bob Mould Wears ‘Blue Hearts’ on His Sleeve

Listening to Bob Mould’s music – his more than a dozen solo albums, his releases leading Sugar in the ’90s, and especially the run of six albums he made with Hüsker Dü in the mid-1980s – and you’re likely to come away with the impression that he’s a pretty intense guy. And while that’s not

For Destroy Boys, The Personal is Political

Co-led by guitarist Violet Mayugba and singer Alexia Roditis, Sacramento punk band Destroy Boys debuted with the 2015 studio EP Sorry Mom. The band’s profile got an early boost when they were favorably mentioned in a 2016 Rolling Stone feature on Green Day. And by 2018 — around the time of the release of their

Album Review: The Gun Club — Fire of Love

Blixa Sounds released an expanded reissue of the Gun Club’s Miami in 2000, and now their similar treatment of the Los Angeles punk band’s debut album, Fire of Love, is getting similar treatment. Oddly – at least to these ears – it’s more accessible than the second LP. Yes, Jeffrey Lee Pierce’s open relationship with

Album Review: Mumps — Rock & Roll This, Rock & Roll That

American pop culture consumers of a certain age (aka television viewers) will recall An American Family, a groundbreaking PBS documentary series that first aired in 1973. Setting aside the fact that the program is to blame for the subsequent rise of “reality” (sic and ugh) television, it was nonetheless important in many ways. One of

The Rubinoos’ Pop-punk Nugget is Unearthed

It wasn’t just punk that arose as an alternative to what many viewed as the overblown, corporate-flavored excess of 1970s rock. Along with punk, a kind of proto-indie pop was bubbling under. And a notable laboratory for those endeavors was Beserkley Records. Founded in 1973 by Matthew King Kaufman, Beserkley introduced the likes of Earth