interview Archive

Climbing That Tree: The Story of She Trinity (Part 5 of 5)

Continued from Part Four… As if She Trinity’s lineup changes weren’t confusing enough, the group went by at least two other names. Yorke doesn’t recall exactly why the band went for a time by the name of British Maid, but she knows that they used the name during a tour of France. “We played all

Climbing That Tree: The Story of She Trinity (Part 4 of 5)

Continued from Part Three… The band had parted ways with Mickie Most by the time Thompson joined. Working with American producer Steve Rowland, She Trinity recorded a single in a West End studio with the saxophonist. The CBS single featured a cover of Gene Pitney’s “Across the Street” backed by “Over and Over Again.” It’s

Climbing That Tree: The Story of She Trinity (Part 3 of 5)

Continued from Part Two… Shelley Gillespie’s main instrument was a Fender Telecaster. “I also had a Vox 12-string for a brief moment, and an acoustic Guild dreadnought,” she recalls. The group’s selection of material reflected the varying tastes – and abilities – within the group. “Robyn liked to tell people that she was once told

Climbing That Tree: The Story of She Trinity (Part 2 of 5)

Continued from Part One… “We always used to wear mens’ Beatle boots, bell-bottom jeans, black turtlenecks with a great big ‘M’ in plaid in the middle, waistcoats and Beatle hats,” Carola Daish recalls. “That was our normal outfit, because – at first – we didn’t want to draw attention to ourselves, that we were girls.

Climbing That Tree: The Story of She Trinity (Part 1 of 5)

It’s possible to be a groundbreaking musical act, to pave the way for future artists all while gaining little fame and fortune yourselves. That’s the case with She Trinity, a remarkable all-woman band of the middle- and late ‘60s. They played their own instruments and worked with a high-profile producer, but the group never broke

Wind Up Happening: Musoscribe Meets LMNOP (Part 5 of 5)

Continued from Part Four… We’ve talked about the whole band concept. But with MIDI technology and everything, do you have any interest at all in doing solo gigs? Well, if I had a means of doing it, possibly. When I was doing all these new songs, I made an additional track without the lead vocals

Wind Up Happening: Musoscribe Meets LMNOP (Part 4 of 5)

Continued from Part Three… I’m not even suggesting that you should – it’s just an open question – but have you ever toyed with the idea of doing something completely in a different musical direction? No. I wish I had the time and energy to go into things like that, but the things that I

Wind Up Happening: Musoscribe Meets LMNOP (Part 3 of 5)

Continued from Part Two… So, then you don’t record everything you write, or do you? Well, yes and no. I record what I call song snippets. I have a little digital recorder where I just come up with ideas, and I just stick them on this thing constantly. There are hundreds and hundreds of these

Wind Up Happening: Musoscribe Meets LMNOP (Part 2 of 5)

Continued from Part One… Thrilled with my new discovery, I raced to my desktop, opened my email app and dashed off a quick note to said publicist. I feverishly typed words to the effect of, “Hey, I’m sure Stephen doesn’t do interviews, but if by some miracle he does, let me know.” I received a

Wind Up Happening: Musoscribe Meets LMNOP (Part 1 of 5)

In one sense, LMNOP is as DIY and underground as it gets. Launched in the early 1980s in Atlanta, LMNOP was – and has remained – the vehicle for Stephen Fievet’s singular lyrical vision, a sometimes disturbing, often unsettling and sometimes wickedly funny approach that all but ensures the music will never break through to