metal Archive

30 Days Out, October 2021 #2: Scott Miller, JackTown Ramblers, Land of the Sky Symphonic Band, GWAR

The eclectic nature that was a defining characteristic of Asheville’s live music scene is returning in these safer-than-recent-months times. Over the next 30 day, you have opportunities to enjoy music that combines things you might not expect: country rock (okay, that one’s a bit obvious but this guy is special), scum rock (stay with me

30 Days Out, September 2021 #1: Deltaphonics, Avatar, Sylvan Esso, Connells

Things are back to normal, but it’s a new normal. Live music has indeed returned, but if you go, plan on wearing a mask, showing proof of vaccination or negative test, and exercising social distancing to the extent that it’s possible. Once you accept all that, there are some fascinating opportunities in the next 30

30 Days Out, August 2021 #2: Peter Holsapple, Jamie Laval, Pop Evil, Free Radio

Asheville is in the process of reasserting its place as a go-to market for intriguing, compelling musical artists. Full-scale national touring is gradually coming back, but for now – with some notable exceptions – regional and local acts tend to dominate the events calendars of our music venues. This edition of 30 Days Out takes

Album Review: Dungeon Weed — Mind Palace of the Mushroom God

With their debut album Mind Palace of the Mushroom God, Oakland sludge rockers Dungeon Weed have carved out a niche of their own. Many stoner rock outfits lean toward a perspective that travels well-trodden territory like dungeons, dragons and other doomy topics. And while Dungeon Weed trades in some of the same subject matter, they

Feminazgul: None More Black, None More Feminine

From the beginning, Asheville-based atmospheric black metal duo Feminazgul staked out its own unique musical territory. The genre is known for its focus upon punishing riffs, themes of violence and mayhem and growling, bowels-of-Hell vocalizing. And while Feminazgul’s music displays all of those characteristics, its debut album No Dawn for Men adds two unusual elements

Album Review: Death Nebula — Ghost of Cassiopeia

If one were to make some sweeping generalizations about doom metal, first among those might be that the artists making it build a sound around a core of guitar/bass/drums, and that they top it off with screaming, essentially indecipherable vocals. (Among fans of the style, the latter is a feature, not a bug.) But as

Dream Theater: The Path That Unites

When dazzling keyboardist Jordan Rudess joined Dream Theater in 1999, the progressive metal band had already been together for nearly 15 years. Through a combination of superb musicianship, thoughtful songwriting and hard work, the group had built a dedicated following. But with Rudess on board, Dream Theater made a significant leap forward on all fronts.

Emotional Content is Dream Theater’s Secret Ingredient

Over the course of its three decades, progressive metal band Dream Theater has periodically created albums centered about thematic concepts. 1999’s Metropolis Pt. 2: Scenes from a Memory was the band’s first concept album, and also marked the debut of Jordan Rudess and the group’s keyboardist. In 2002, the Boston-based band released Six Degrees of

Ultimate Trip: Riverside Sets Sight on North America (Part Three)

Continued from Part Two… You mentioned Lunatic Soul. To date, you’ve done a very good job of keeping Lunatic Soul as a separate project distinct from Riverside. Do you ever see a time in which the two might blend into a single project? I don’t think so. Of course, I’m the main composer in Riverside,

Ultimate Trip: Riverside Sets Sight on North America (Part Two)

Continued from Part One… The first three Riverside albums are a trilogy, but recent releases don’t so much have that conceptual continuity. Is the idea of conceptually-linked releases something that you’ve left behind? Reality Dream Trilogy was connected mostly because of the lyrics, mostly because of the Travis Smith [album] covers. And the music, let’s