todd rundgren Archive

Album Reviews: Two featuring Fernando Perdomo

In this post-major-label era when many of the so-called barriers to entry have been swept away, the fact that a recording artist is prolific doesn’t provide a reliable indicator as to the quality of that output. When you get right down to it, anybody can “release” anything they want, whenever they like. So it’s important

With Live Concerts on Hold, Todd Rundgren Employs Technology as Something to Fall Back On

This concert review appeared previously in PROG Magazine. Sidelined by the pandemic, multigenre hero Todd Rundgren did what he often does: he looked to technology to provide human connection. And in 2021 that means mounting a live stream concert. But not a pajamas-at-home acoustic affair; no, for Rundgren the “Clearly Human” tour would deliver all

Todd Rundgren’s 1989 album ‘Nearly Human’ gets a Covid-era 2nd Wind

Even in the face of widespread venue closures, Todd Rundgren has found a way to bring live music to his fans. His run of shows had one of its final dates when he played for a Bay Area audience on March 19. But he and his band didn’t come to San Francisco; they were in

Todd Rundgren’s “Clearly Human” Tour: The Ever Popular Geofenced Artist Effect (Part Two)

Continued from Part One … “We’re doing 25 shows specifically targeted to 25 markets,” Rundgren says. “And everything that we do will be in the pursuit of preserving the experience both for the audience and for the band.” The focus is squarely on making each show a unique event, in a manner as close as

Todd Rundgren’s “Clearly Human” Tour: The Ever Popular Geofenced Artist Effect (Part One)

An edited version of this feature appeared previously in New City. For his latest concert tour, perennial wunderkid Todd Rundgren is revisiting his 1989 album Nearly Human. With an expanded band featuring longtime musical associates Kasim Sulton, Gil Assayas, Prairie Prince, Rundgren’s wife Michele and five others, the “Clearly Human” tour represents the latest in

Album Review: The Ed Palermo Big Band — The Adventures of Zodd Zundgren

Frank Zappa’s body of work is massive. Even if one limits oneself to the music released during his lifetime, it’s a lot. Me, I have his first 45 or so albums on vinyl, and scattered post-vinyl-era releases as well. And for those who appreciate his work, it’s possible to focus on specific styles and/or eras

Album Review: Todd Rundgren’s Utopia – Benefit for Moogy Klingman

After the success of his double LPs Something/Anything? (1972) and Todd (1974) as well as the double-album in all but pressing A Wizard/A True Star (1973), Todd Rundgren decided to channel his progressive proclivities into a project separate from his solo work. Utopia was thus born. And while the earliest lineup never recorded, as the

Shot in the Dark: Utopia’s ‘Adventures in Utopia’ at at 40

Utopia – or Todd Rundgren’s Utopia, as it was originally and would years later again be known – started out as one thing and became another. In its original form, Utopia was a progressive rock band modeled on a foundation similar to that of acts like Yes and Mahavishnu Orchestra. And while those two groups

The ‘It Was Fifty Years Ago Today’ Tour, Part Two

The continuing story of the Beatles’ White Album Continued from Part One… Todd Rundgren readily admits that he views The Beatles as an uneven record. “The album is incoherent,” he says, “and contains stuff that a lot of us found curious, but not essential, like ‘Revolution 9.’” But he acknowledges that for many listeners it

The ‘It Was Fifty Years Ago Today’ Tour, Part One

The continuing story of the Beatles’ White Album Tribute concerts and tours are a fixture of today’s live music experience. Sometimes they’re self-tribute: Legacy acts take advantage of decades of goodwill and embark on victory-lap tours in which they recreate some of their most revered work. Brian Wilson has been touring for years in support