the black watch Archive

Album Review: The Black Watch — Here & There

If their music wasn’t so good, I’d almost be a bit annoyed by The Black Watch. John Andrew Fredrick barely gives lovers of his fine, evocative, atmosphere and highly tuneful music enough time to absorb his latest offering before he’s back wit another one of an equally indispensable nature. So here we are mere months

Album Review: The Black Watch — Led Zeppelin Five

I don’t make a habit of employing Yiddish words or phrases in writing of speaking. I’m not a member of the tribe. But when the situations call for it, when no other word will do, I make an exception. Here goes: The Black Watch has some chutzpah. Or at least they did in 2011, when

Album Review: The Black Watch – Fromthing Somethat

It’s difficult to keep up with the steady stream of output from The Black Watch. Just last year the group led by John Andrew Fredrick released a pair of albums – the 31 Years of Obscurity compilation and the all new Magic Johnson. Those were followed in short order by Brilliant Failures, reviewed in April.

Album Review: The Black Watch — Brilliant Failures

John Andrew Fredrick is one prolific artist. It seems that every few months a new album from his group, The Black Watch, appears on my desk. And he stands apart from other super-prolific musicians in a very important aspect: though much of their work is superb, R. Stevie Moore and Robert Pollard (to name two)

Musoscribe’s Best of 2019: Reissue/archival Releases

2019 was another great year for reissue and archival releases. A few stood out as especially noteworthy; those are listed and briefly described) below. More details (my reviews, interviews … that sort of thing) can be found by clicking the links below each. The Black Watch – 31 Years of Obscurity I wasn’t familiar John

Hundred-word Reviews for August 2019, Part One

It’s that time again: reviews of new music that passes the rigorous “smash or trash” competition happening periodically at my CD changer. Diplomats of Solid Sound — A Higher Place First off, let’s give credit where it’s due and acknowledge that Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings are owed a debt for reintroducing soul to today’s