org music Archive

Album Review: Eric Slick – Palisades

A former student (alongside his sister Julie Slick) at the Paul Green School of Rock Music, Eric Slick was catapulted to well-deserved fame when Adrian Belew chose him and Julie to work as his rhythm section in the Adrian Belew Power Trio in the mid- to late 2000s. From there, Eric joined Dr. Dog as

Album Review: Jeannie C. Riley — Harper Valley P.T.A.

I’ve gone on about this idea before, but it never ceases to fascinate me, so I’ll mention it again. Those of us of a certain age — boomers, I guess you’d say – came of age in an era that was characterized in part at least by shared experience. Where popular culture was concerned, pretty

Album Review: Detective — s/t

By the mid 1970s, having one’s own boutique record label was a symbol of Having Arrived. The Beatles started it all with Apple, and within a few years, The Moody Blues had Threshold, Deep Purple had (naturally) Purple Records, and The Rolling Stones had their own eponymous label. So it came as little surprise when

Album Review: Merry Christmas from Jackie Wilson

If you sent or received anything via the US Postal Service in the final months of 2020, you likely know that due to some serious shenanigans on the part of the DC regime that eventually rioted and then left town with its tail between its legs, mail was delayed. Sometimes extraordinarily so. I mention this

Album Review: Big Bill Broonzy — The Midnight Special

Big Bill Broonzy’s musical influence is incalculable. And even though he recorded prolifically, a new archival release is an important addition to his body of work. A solo acoustic performance, Midnight Special: Live in Nottingham 1957 showcases Broonzy’s myriad assets. Foremost among those are his fine and expressive voice, his peerless selection of material, his

Album Review: Jimmy Sweeney — Without You

Another in the (happily and) seemingly endless stream of unearthed gems, Jimmy Sweeney’s Without You is a collection of songs by a singer who was all but unknown. His claim to fame lies in a story – possibly apocryphal but leaning toward being true – about a demo he sent to Sam Phillips. That disc

Album Review: Nat Turner Rebellion – Laugh to Keep From Crying

I’ve written of similar observations before; here I am doing it once again. It amazes me to no end that so many years after the fact, never-before-heard recordings surface, and the quality of the music is remarkable. So it is with Nat Turner Rebellion’s Laugh to Keep From Crying. Recorded in various sessions between 1969

Before the (Family) Stone Age: The Viscaynes (Part Three)

Continued from Part Two … One afternoon soon thereafter, Chuck Gebhardt found himself mowing the very same lawn. “Next thing I knew, a limo pulled up, and my mom got out,” he recalls. “Come on; we’ve got to go to Los Angeles,” she told him. Gebhardt hesitated; he was only halfway done with the grass

Before the (Family) Stone Age: The Viscaynes (Part Two)

Continued from Part One … Belying his eventual reputation as an erratic personality, the young Sly Stone was considered an engaging fellow. “He was a great guy,” Gebhardt says. In addition to being in the Viscaynes together, he and Sly “did plays together – he was a pretty darn good actor – and we played

Before the (Family) Stone Age: The Viscaynes (Part One)

An edited version of this feature appeared previously in Goldmine Magazine. The music and career of Sly Stone and his group The Family Stone is well known. What’s less explored is his earliest work, recordings made when he was still Sly Stewart, a teenager in Vallejo, California. Those original singles are now impossibly rare, though