Hundred-word Reviews for October 2017: New Music

Here’s ten more hundred-word reviews. All new releases. All worth a spin, and in most cases, several spins. The Fresh & Onlys – Wolf Lie Down (Sinderlyn) I’m not sure what wave of psychedelia revival we’re on these days: fourth? Fifth? No matter. And anyway, the Fresh & Onlys have long since moved beyond the

A Few Moments with Hans-Joachim Roedelius

German composer Hans-Joachim Roedelius is a synthesizer pioneer, and a leading light of ambient music. Yet acoustic piano is his instrument of choice, and he has little use for the term “ambient.” Roedelius made a rare North American appearance at the Mothlight on March 18 before heading to Knoxville for this year’s Big Ears Festival.

André Cholmondeley: Tech/Tour Manager to the Stars

Guitarist André Cholmondeley visited Asheville as early as 2001 when his Frank Zappa tribute band Project/Object played a show at Stella Blue (now the Asheville Music Hall). By 2006, he had moved here from New Jersey, and his career had taken a major, unexpected turn. In the space of just a few years, he went

Hometown Writing

Asheville, NC is my adopted hometown. After more than a quarter-century in a smog-filled, traffic-jammed metropolis, I escaped to the Blue Ridge Mountains in 2000. I’m never leaving. And while my own personal musical preferences are well-advertised, I often — more and more as time goes on — interview local artists and/or write about subjects

Album Mini-review: Claypool Lennon Delirium — Monolith of Phobos

File next to: A Saucerful of Secrets-era Pink Floyd, Primus, Plastic Ono Band Les Claypool‘s detractors point to his tendency toward being too clever by half, for making self-consciously “weird” music with wacky sounds, a kind of less creative, poor man’s Frank Zappa. Sean Lennon has moved in some odd musical directions, but has avoided

Black Mountain: Canadian Krautrock?

Conventional wisdom holds that Vancouver-based Black Mountain is somehow retro in its approach to making music. A more careful listen, however, suggests that the band’s music features new sounds that are informed by (but not copies of) the heavy sounds of 1970s rock. But on their latest album (and first in nearly six years), IV,

Hundred-word Reviews for June 2016, Part 2

Five more quick reviews. Some great stuff here. Today’s five all fall pretty neatly into the progressive rock category. Security Project – Live 1 Tribute acts can be a dodgy affair, especially when the subject of said tribute still performs. But these guys are truly legit. One, Peter Gabriel no longer performs his early solo

Asheville Electro Music Festival: High Technology, Human Scale

In his influential 1982 book Megatrends, author John Naisbitt observed that “whenever new technology is introduced into society, there must be a counterbalancing human response, or the technology is rejected.” The very human and innovative nature of 21st century synthesizer-based music is a real-world example of Naisbitt’s observations in action. A local group of musicians

Album Mini-review: Matthew Bourne — moogmemory

File next to: Philip Glass, Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark, Brian Eno The Memorymoog was the last synthesizer produced by Moog Music during the original company’s run; while a deeply versatile and expressive instrument, its complex inner workings made it highly unreliable, and that contributed both to the damaging of Moog’s reputation and to the

Album Mini-review: Endless Tapes — Brilliant Waves

File next to: Brian Eno, Lunatic Soul, *Low-era David Bowie Considering the pedigree of the better-known half of this duo, one might expect Brilliant Waves to lean in a muscular and “proggy” direction.” Bassist Colin Edwin is renowned for his work on twenty Porcupine Tree albums, plus many other projects that showcase a harder, musically