EP Review: Lynx Deluxe — Jungleland

Here’s something different. Lynx Deluxe’s Jungleland is a five-song EP that builds its sound around heavy beats. Not the electronic kind, though; this is no hip-hip or electro endeavor. Real drums, played forcefully and with a keen balance between complexity and sheer power, form the basis of these tunes. The songs themselves are hooky rockers,

Album Review: Sour Ops — X

Say it loud: power pop and proud! Readers of this online music magazine will know that while I approach it with guarded optimism, I do like me some power pop. They’ll also agree that the term is oft-abused, so much so that quite a few artists who might fit into the category instead abhor the

Album Review: The Orange Peels — Celebrate the Moments of Your Life

One never quite knows what to expect from The Orange Peels, and within that uncertainty lies a part of the group’s charm. They certainly don’t fit neatly into any particular musical subcategory, be it power pop, art rock or anything else, but hints of those styles make themselves known within the context of individual songs.

A Conversation with The Residents’ Spokesman Homer Flynn (Part 2 of 2)

Continued from Part One… Bill Kopp: The Residents’ Ralph Records was launched in ’72, and the label always existed well outside of what could be considered the ‘commercial sphere.’ In some ways, that almost made its existence sort of counterintuitive. Was there ever a point at which the label was financially remunerative, and was that

A Conversation with The Residents’ Spokesman Homer Flynn (Part 1 of 2)

I recently interviewed Homer Flynn of The Cryptic Corporation, discussing the Residents, the anonymous avant garde group of which Flynn may or may not be a founding member. The conversation – a kind of followup to my 2006(!) interview of Hardy Fox – formed the basis of my feature for SF Weekly. But a great

Permanent Residents: SF’s Notorious Avant Garde Collective Looks to the Future

Few in the early 1970s might have predicted that one of music’s strangest (and most original) acts would continue to tour and release new music well into the 21st century. But San Francisco-based avant garde collective The Residents have always confounded expectations. Though the group’s history is by design murky and mysterious, it’s generally accepted

Flights Are Back on Schedule for Travers Brothership

Brothers Kyle and Eric Travers launched their band, Travers Brothership, nearly a decade ago in Black Mountain. After a few years of honing their approach, they recorded and released their debut album, A Way to Survive, in 2016. That same year the rock/jam/blues band won the title of “#1 Alternative Band in WNC” in the

Album Review: Professor Longhair – Fess at Home

This intimate recording absolutely sparkles. You are right there at Tipitina’s in 1973 as Henry Roeland Byrd (Professor Longhair, or “Fess” to those in the know) stretches out for a rollicking performance on the piano, aided and abetted wonderfully by percussionist Alfred “Uganda” Roberts. The good professor’s vocals are somewhat indistinct for the opener “Tipitina,”

30 Days Out, October 2021 #1: Jimbo Mathus, Rocky Horror Show, Buddy Guy, Tennis

Americana that’s more than twang. Classic camp. A blues legend. Retro-pop. Those are four of the highlights on the Asheville music calendar these coming 30 days. Artist: Jimbo Mathus Venue: The Grey Eagle (patio) Date: Friday, Oct. 8, 6 p.m. Door: $15 If you only know Jimbo Mathus from his role as leader of Squirrel

Album Review: Nektar – …Sounds Like Swiss

Nektar was one of those bands that got lost in a sea of great music. Though they were British, being based in Germany certainly didn’t help gain them exposure in places like the U.S. So despite the high quality of their music – especially on albums like 1971’s Journey to the Center of the Eye,