vinyl Archive

Album Review: Detective — s/t

By the mid 1970s, having one’s own boutique record label was a symbol of Having Arrived. The Beatles started it all with Apple, and within a few years, The Moody Blues had Threshold, Deep Purple had (naturally) Purple Records, and The Rolling Stones had their own eponymous label. So it came as little surprise when

Album Review: Various — Always Memphis Rock and Roll

For me, the Black & Wyatt Records label is a trademark of quality. Since its launch in 2018, the Memphis label has sought to bring interesting and outside-the-box music to the wider public. And it’s been quite successful on that score: I’ve covered a number of Black & Wyatt releases here on Musoscribe, including titles

Album Review: Pepper Adams – Live at Room at the Top

To date, my familiarity to the work of saxophonist and composer Pepper Adams has been minimal. I discovered and enjoyed a 2014 vinyl reissue of Bethlehem Records’ 1960 release Motor City Scene, featuring an uncredited Adams leading an all-star band through a lively set. And I dug his work on 1959’s Chet Baker’s Riverside album

Album Review: The Jars — Make Love Not War

My new book, Disturbing the Peace: 415 Records and the Rise of New Wave explores the story of the Bay Area independent record label and the nearly 30 artists – most all local to the Bay Area – who released music on 415. The punk and new wave scene of the late ‘70s and early-to-mid

Album Review: Bill Evans — Inner Spirit

A week’s worth of coverage of new vinyl releases continues with the second of two archival releases from a jazz giant. Bill Evans played Buenos Aires in 1973, and a recording of that performance has received legitimate release on Resonance Records. Six years later he was back again, for what would turn out to be

Album Review: Bill Evans – Morning Glory

A week’s worth of coverage of new vinyl releases kicks off with a vintage recording. Bill Evans earned fame for his work with Miles Davis, and went on to an acclaimed solo career. Much of the pianist’s most important work was done within the trio format; his short-lived lineup with bassist Scott LaFaro and Paul

Album Review: Chris Lujan & Electric Butter — The Real Thing

A couple of months ago, I wrote a Metro Silicon Valley feature about Raza del Soul, a California record label dedicated to preserving old (and celebrating new) Chicano soul music. Headed by J.M. Valle, Raza del Soul does important work that also happens to bring wonderful music to today’s listeners. In addition to reissuing 45

Boxed Set Review: Fuzztones Salute the Greats

For decades now, The Fuzztones have been doing the important work of keeping the garage punk flame burning. Originally a New York City aggregation, the band led by Rudi Protrudi resettled in Germany many years ago, and there they remain. The band’s body of work is extensive, and in recent years has been appended by

Album Review: Popol Vuh – Vol. 2: Acoustic & Ambient Spheres

In 2019, BMG put together a boxed set of five important albums by krautrock/ambient group Popol Vuh. The Essential Album Collection Vol. 1 featured vinyl re-pressings of Affenstunde (1970), 1972’s Hosianna Mantra, the band’s high water mark of Einsjäger & Siebenjäger from 1974, Aguirre (1976) and the group’s Nosferatu soundtrack from 1978. Taken together, those

Raza del Soul’s ‘Revolución del Vinilo’

In California of the 1960s, a style of music known as Chicano soul (sometimes referred to as brown-eyed soul – took hold among listeners. Groups like Cannibal & the Headhunters (“Land of a Thousand Dances”) and Thee Midniters (“Whittier Boulevard”) thrilled audiences and achieved some measure of national success. But as prevailing styles came and