reissue Archive

Album Review: The Troggs — The Trogg Tapes

First, a few words about what this isn’t. It’s not the infamous “Troggs Tapes” studio outtake, an audio gem that initially circulated among aficionados and collectors of the strange and hilarious. That tape is a 1970 document of members of The Troggs arguing in the recording studio, and is responsible for adding the immortal phrases

Album Review: Love Tractor — Themes from Venus

It’s worth noting that Atlanta and Athens, Georgia are a mere 70 miles apart. I mention this because back in the 1980s when I lived in the suburbs of Atlanta (I was ultimately in the metro area for some 27 years) and followed the local music scene, it was a common mistake to think of

Album Review: The Left Banke – Strangers on a Train

When the terms “baroque pop” or “baroque rock” come up in conversation, discussion of The Left Banke is assuredly to follow. While the group scored only a few hits – “Walk Away Reneé,” “Pretty Ballerina” and the lesser-known but equally wonderful “She May Call You Up Tonight” – they established a stylistic template that other

Album Re-Review: Two Pound Planet — Songs from the Hydrogen Jukebox

Today I’m revisiting a review originally posted more than a year ago. Songs From the Hydrogen Jukebox received what we’ll call a soft release in late 2020. As nice as that set looked, it’s really about the music. And now it’s out with professional packaging worthy of the contents inside. Highly recommended, like I already

Album Review: Marshall Crenshaw — #447

I vividly recall just how knocked out I was upon first hearing Marshall Crenshaw’s self-titled LP debut in 1982. Recorded four decades ago this month, it was released a few months later. Its chiming sound and uncluttered instrumentation provided a perfect canvas for Crenshaw’s wonderful songwriting and appealing vocals. In some ways it was totally

Album Review: Baby Buddha — Music for Teenage Sects

My deep dive into the history of San Francisco-based indie record label 415 Records has yielded a book, Disturbing the Peace: 415 Records and the Rise of New Wave; it’s due out in a matter of days, and is available for pre-order now . And while I came into the project knowing a good bit

Album Review: Smoke Fairies – Through Low Light and Trees

In early 2020, thanks to the good graces of a kind music publicist, I received a copy of Darkness Brings the Wonder Home, the 7th album from British folk rock band Smoke Fairies. I was duly impressed with the record. As I noted in a review posted in March of last year, the band creates

Album Review: Bill Lloyd — Working the Long Game

While it’s true that Bill Lloyd first came to prominence as half of the c&w duo Foster and Lloyd – an outfit that did some fine work in that genre – today his reputation centers primarily around his solo work. And that music is much more accurately described as (oh, here it comes) power pop.

Album Review: Jethro Tull – A (La Mode: The 40th Anniversary Edition)

Led by Ian Anderson, Jethro Tull was among the most popular of so-called progressive rock groups of the 1970s. Its distinctive combination of British folk and hard rock textures scored the band worldwide success. And though the group’s lineup shifted constantly, stalwarts Anderson (vocals, flute, guitar) and lead guitarist Martin Barre were Jethro Tull’s creative

Album Review: Andrew Gold’s Halloween Howls

Musician, singer and songwriter Andrew Gold combined a commercial (read: broadly accessible) sensibility with superb songwriting chops. With so many years having passed, many forget (if they knew at all) that Gold was Linda Ronstadt’s band leader through one of her most creatively fertile periods. Speaking of forgetting, it’s too often forgotten now, but his