prog Archive

Album Review: Be-Bop Deluxe – Modern Music

Be-Bop Deluxe was one of those bands that didn’t fit neatly into a genre classification. Variously classified as progressive rock, glam rock and art rock, in truth none of those labels sits comfortably upon their body of work. Led by highly regarded guitarist Bill Nelson, the band – which lasted a relatively short six or

DVD Review: Krautrock: Romantic Warriors IV Part 1

The term krautrock may just be one of those labels that is meaningful only to those who exist inside a kind of bubble. The person on the street, so to speak, is unlikely to have ever heard the term, much less to know what it represents. Very loosely defined, krautrock is the rock music that

30 Days Out, June 2020 #2: Hearts Gone South, Angel Olsen, Natural Born Leaders, The Get Right Band

If you’re at all like me, you may have noticed this phenomenon: when you take on a new task, you stumble as you learn your way through it. And by the time you finally figure out the most efficient and effective way to do it, you’re nearly done. Perhaps that’s the case with musicians and

Album Review: Todd Rundgren’s Utopia – Benefit for Moogy Klingman

After the success of his double LPs Something/Anything? (1972) and Todd (1974) as well as the double-album in all but pressing A Wizard/A True Star (1973), Todd Rundgren decided to channel his progressive proclivities into a project separate from his solo work. Utopia was thus born. And while the earliest lineup never recorded, as the

Album Review: David Cross and Peter Banks — Crossover

David Cross came to fame as member of King Crimson during the band’s first run of incarnations; he played violin on Larks Tongues in Aspic and Starless and Bible Black. Peter Banks was the original guitarist in Yes. Both musicians continued to work after their most high-profile turns, often drawing on assistance from their former

30 Days Out, June 2020 #1: TAUK, Ben Folds, Vancouver Electronic Ensemble, John Prine Tribute

In recent weeks I’ve conducted interviews with a number of professions whose businesses involve servicing the music community in various ways. A consensus seems to be forming – and this isn’t likely to come as any surprise to you, I suspect – that widespread live concerts aren’t likely to return until 2021. Festivals and small

Album Review: Fernando Perdomo – Out to Sea 3

To the list of artists who release stunning amounts of material – Robert Pollard, R. Stevie Moore – we must now add Fernando Perdomo. The guitarist-producer has been on quite a tear since relocating from southern Florida to Los Angeles some years back. In addition to producing other artists, engaging in tribute and collaboration projects

Album Review: Seiche — Demo Press

By the dawn of the 1980s, progressive rock was decidedly out of fashion. Neither mainstream radio – which never really embraced the genre, save for free-form FM stations – nor the record-buying public showed much interest in the knotty, ambitious and cerebral sounds that a few years earlier had flourished on the music landscape. The

Album Review: Dave Kerzner — Breakdown

I’ve come across Kerzner’s music before; he made a quite-good Yes tribute with frequent collaborator Fernando Perdomo, and I reviewed his concept album Static just over two years ago. This new 2CD set, however, will be the best entry point for those new to the man’s work. A survey of his work to date, Breakdown

Prepare Yourself: Porcupine Tree’s ‘The Sky Moves Sideways’ at 25 (Part 2)

Continued from Part One … The nature of the music on The Sky Moves Sideways gives bassist Colin Edwin comparatively little to do as well: while he’s an instrumentalist of the first order, there’s often not a great deal in Wilson’s compositions here that lends itself to low-end fireworks. While that would change significantly on