prog Archive

Book Review: Steve Hackett — A Genesis in My Bed

As a longtime fan of early Genesis and the solo work of Steve Hackett – as well as having interviewed Hackett on no less than three occasions and seen him live onstage as well – I simply couldn’t pass up the opportunity to read his autobiography/memoir, A Genesis in My Bed. It would be a

Hello Hello: A Look Back at Caravan’s Second Album (at Fifty)

Rock fans who bought LPs in the late ‘60s and early 1970s may recall that some labels made use of the records’ inner sleeves as means to hype their other offerings. Certainly more elegant than the You-may-also-enjoy* hype that Capitol applied to back covers of Beatles LPs for a time, these full color inner sleeves

Second Verse, Better Than the First: The Choir Reunites (Part 3 of 3)

Continued from Part Two … Jim Bonfanti explains that it was the reunion of The Raspberries that would eventually lead to The Choir getting back together. “We were working on the Pop Art deal,” he says, referring to Omnivore Recordings’ 2CD release of a November 2004 Raspberries concert recording. Released years later in 2017, that

Second Verse, Better Than the First: The Choir Reunites (Part 2 of 3)

Continued from Part One … The Choir certainly knew how to rock hard; the group’s cover of The Kinks’ “David Watts” made that plain. But the musicians were at their collective best digging into more complex material. Few bands then or now would think to cover The Nice’s arrangement of Leonard Bernstein’s “America.” But The

Second Verse, Better Than the First: The Choir Reunites (Part 1 of 3)

Omnivore Recordings presents a live reunion of Cleveland late-’60s proto-progressive band Ask a casual rock fan if he or she has heard of The Choir, and you’re likely to get a quizzical look followed by a “no.” Pose the same question to a hardcore music fiend – especially one with a familiarity with the Cleveland

Yes’ ‘Drama’ at 40: A Critical Look Back at the Band’s Most Controversial LP

It’s accepted conventional wisdom now that the 1980s were a tough time for progressive rock. The subgenre enjoyed its heyday – commercially and critically – beginning in the very late 1960s and continuing into the mid- to later part of the ‘70s. And while the revisionist notion that punk “killed” prog is wildly overstated –

One Good Reason: Alan Parsons on the ‘Ammonia Avenue’ Boxed Set … and More (Part Two)

Continued from Part One … Bill Kopp: Back in the ’70s and the early ’80s, did Arista Records ever put pressure on you to assemble a live band? Alan Parsons: No, I don’t think so. They knew my identity was in the studio, and that’s what I was. I was a producer and engineer, and

One Good Reason: Alan Parsons on the ‘Ammonia Avenue’ Boxed Set … and More (Part One)

Alan Parsons is a unique figure in popular music; very few people go from working as a recording engineer and producer to becoming an artist in their own right. After working behind the scenes with the Beatles and Pink Floyd, Parsons formed his own Project (not, he explains, a group). Between 1976 and 1987, the

Album Review: Sonar with David Torn — Tranceportation (Volume 2)

In my April 2018 review of Vortex, the first collaboration between Sonar and guitar master David Torn, I likened the music to ‘80s-period King Crimson at its most accessible, citing Crim’s “The Sheltering Sky” instrumental as a useful reference point. Between then and now I seem to have missed an album by this aggregation, because

Album Review: Be-Bop Deluxe – Modern Music

Be-Bop Deluxe was one of those bands that didn’t fit neatly into a genre classification. Variously classified as progressive rock, glam rock and art rock, in truth none of those labels sits comfortably upon their body of work. Led by highly regarded guitarist Bill Nelson, the band – which lasted a relatively short six or