post-rock Archive

John Lydon is … Happy? (Part One)

“Ever get the feeling you’ve been cheated?” With that question posed to an audience at San Francisco’s Winterland on January 14, 1978, visibly unhappy vocalist Johnny Rotten (neé Lydon) ended his tenure with the Sex Pistols. Not counting relatively brief reunions in 1996 and 2007, that gig marked the effective end of the band, though

EP Review: Ghostdog — A Circle of Stones

Yearning, melancholy midtempo rock with a dreamy feel is merely one of the stocks-in-trade of Asheville-based Ghostdog. But it’s worth noting that the group playfully describes its music as “Wussy-boy emo pop.” The group’s second EP, A Circle of Stones opens with “Party On, Emma’s Grove.” Will Isaacson’s complex guitar figure and Adam Freshcorn’s knotty

New Music Review Roundup, Part 3

Today I wrap up three days’ worth of reviews of new music. Dig if you will. The Pollyseeds – Sounds of Crenshaw, Vol. 1 As far as I know, none of the music on Sounds of Crenshaw Vol. 1 is used on the soundtrack of the Amazon Original series Bosch, but – like that crime

New Music Review Roundup, Part 1

I’ve got lots of new music to tell you about. Eighteen albums in all, which I’ll cover over three days. Let’s get started. The Brigadier – Wash Away the Day Imagine a hybrid of mid-sixties Brian Wilson, the Raspberries, Brill Building girl group pop (sung by a guy) and the Rubinoos. Now add a dash

Russian Circles: Making Music in a Post-rock World

In a valiant attempt to provide helpful points of reference for music listeners, journalists have concocted all manner of genre labels. Some – folk-rock, for example – are useful in describing a style of music. Others are virtually meaningless. So it is with post-rock, a term first used in the mid 1990s to describe music

Sigur Rós Proves That Music Really is the Universal Language

A brief written description of the music of Sigur Rós rarely does it justice. Variously described as post-rock, impressionistic, glacial and abstract, the music on the trio’s seven studio albums often features falsetto vocals in either the group’s native Icelandic or an invented, wordless “language” called Hopelandic or vonlenska. But while that summary might suggest

Five Quick Ones

About once a month I like to visit my “in for review” shelf and pull out some titles that I’ve been meaning to get to for some time. For whatever reason, other projects or reviews have taken precedence, causing these worthy releases to gather the odd bit of dust on my shelf. I will have

Album Mini-review: Public Image Ltd — What the World Needs Now…

File Next to: The Fall, Killing Joke, Gang of Four It’s been nearly forty years since Never Mind the Bollocks was released; try wrapping your mind around that fact. Back then, the idea that vocalist Johnny Rotten (neé John Lydon) would somehow carve out a career niche for himself would have been laughable. But in

Hundred-word Reviews for July 2015, Part 3

Blues, r&b, post-jazz and country-flavored singer/songwriter music: never let it be said that I only write about rock. Here are five fine releases in a wide array of musical styles. Rusty Wright Band – Wonder Man Take the attitude of big-band swing and electric guitar blues, and apply it to uptempo rock’n’roll, and you might

Festival Review: Big Ears Festival 2015, Part 2

Continued from Part One… Next, it was drone time. The minimalist work of the duo A Winged Victory for the Sullen (joined by three additional musicians) was delivered in the bright, daylit room at the Knoxville Museum of Art. The hypnotic vibe of the group’s work lent itself to simply sitting back and closing one’s