garage Archive

Album Review: The Roaring 420s – What is Psych?

There’s a bubbling-under sort of cottage industry in sixties revivalism. And it’s been around for at least a couple of decades now, occasionally popping into the mainstream consciousness to enjoy a charting single or album. Of course Oasis raised the practice to fetishism in the 1990s, shifting millions of units for their trouble. And the

Album Review: Sun Ra — A Space Odyssey

As Kris Needs notes in his excellent and detailed liner notes for A Space Odyssey: From Birmingham to the Big Apple – The Quest Begins, Sun Ra was a practitioner of “garage jazz.” Today (May 22 2014) would have been the 100th birthday of the man born Herman Blount, though once he rechristened himself Sun

Album Review: Night Beats — Sonic Bloom

Modern perspectives on 60s garage rock have littered the musical landscape in the 21st century. But I’m reminded of an oft-repeated response to all that by a friend of mine. Upon hearing the latest band claiming to faithfully re-create the garage rock vibe of 1965-68, he often remarks upon the result, saying something like, “Aww…that’s

It’s a Mondo Zombie Boogaloo!

It’s one thing to make good music. A challenging thing, not to be taken for granted, but as far as live performance goes, ultimately it’s only one part of the mix. Another thing is to put on a good show. Some artists do that without getting the first part of the equation (Gene Simmons, I’m

Album Review: Various — In Fuzz We Trust

The premise alone is enough to set your head a-spinning. First, start with a bunch of sixties garage bands, the kind immortalized on the legendary Lenny Kaye-curated Nuggets album. Now flash forward to the 1980s and beyond, when a second wave of bands spring up in tribute to the garage/psych sound of yesteryear. Now flash

Fuzzy Memories: A Conversation with The Fuzztones’ Rudi Protrudi, Part Three

Continued from Part Two… Rudi Protrudi: We did a single in 1972 and our singer was very into Jethro Tull , and we did “Locomotive Breath” along with a lot of other stuff. He played flute, and he had the Ian Anderson thing down. Yeah, I like the song. And so when we started writing

Fuzzy Memories: A Conversation with The Fuzztones’ Rudi Protrudi, Part Two

Continued from Part One… Bill Kopp: Throughout The Fuzztones‘ history, you’ve again and again managed the tricky feat of writing new, original songs that fit the aesthetic of stuff from 1965-66. Is it a conscious effort to do that, or by now are you so immersed in the style that it just happens that way?

Fuzzy Memories: A Conversation with The Fuzztones’ Rudi Protrudi, Part One

Since 1980, The Fuzztones have been leaders in keeping the garage rock flame alive. Originally based in New York City, the group – led by singer-guitarist Rudi Protrudi – eventually emigrated to Germany, where they believe they’ve found a more receptive audience. There’s been a fair amount of Fuzztones-related activity in recent years; among the

Album Review: Various Artists — Los Nuggetz: ’60s Garage & Psych from Latin America

During the first four or five years of this new century, there existed online a thriving collector/trading community, dedicated to sharing and disseminating obscure, forgotten and occasionally never-known-about-in-the-first place music from the 1960s. Operating right on the edge of copyright law (well, on the wrong side of it, if truth be told), these collectors shared

EP Review: Drivin’ n’ Cryin’ — Songs from the Psychedelic Time Clock

In terms of delivering new music, Drivin’ n’ Cryin’ is employing a strategy not unlike that of Marshall Crenshaw. Instead of releasing an album after a couple years’ wait, both acts are meting out new music in smaller, EP-sized bites. From a marketing (or fan relations) standpoint, this is a solid approach; it keeps the