With Live Concerts on Hold, Todd Rundgren Employs Technology as Something to Fall Back On

This concert review appeared previously in PROG Magazine. Sidelined by the pandemic, multigenre hero Todd Rundgren did what he often does: he looked to technology to provide human connection. And in 2021 that means mounting a live stream concert. But not a pajamas-at-home acoustic affair; no, for Rundgren the “Clearly Human” tour would deliver all

Todd Rundgren’s 1989 album ‘Nearly Human’ gets a Covid-era 2nd Wind

Even in the face of widespread venue closures, Todd Rundgren has found a way to bring live music to his fans. His run of shows had one of its final dates when he played for a Bay Area audience on March 19. But he and his band didn’t come to San Francisco; they were in

Todd Rundgren’s “Clearly Human” Tour: The Ever Popular Geofenced Artist Effect (Part Two)

Continued from Part One … “We’re doing 25 shows specifically targeted to 25 markets,” Rundgren says. “And everything that we do will be in the pursuit of preserving the experience both for the audience and for the band.” The focus is squarely on making each show a unique event, in a manner as close as

Todd Rundgren’s “Clearly Human” Tour: The Ever Popular Geofenced Artist Effect (Part One)

An edited version of this feature appeared previously in New City. For his latest concert tour, perennial wunderkid Todd Rundgren is revisiting his 1989 album Nearly Human. With an expanded band featuring longtime musical associates Kasim Sulton, Gil Assayas, Prairie Prince, Rundgren’s wife Michele and five others, the “Clearly Human” tour represents the latest in

Album Review: Todd Rundgren’s Utopia – Benefit for Moogy Klingman

After the success of his double LPs Something/Anything? (1972) and Todd (1974) as well as the double-album in all but pressing A Wizard/A True Star (1973), Todd Rundgren decided to channel his progressive proclivities into a project separate from his solo work. Utopia was thus born. And while the earliest lineup never recorded, as the

Can’t Stop Running: Todd Rundgren’s ‘Nearly Human’ at 30

Being a serious fan of Todd Rundgren isn’t always an easy path, but it’s a rewarding one. The wunderkind from Upper Darby, Pennsylvania started his musical career out in relatively conventional fashion – as guitarist for late ’60s proto-powerpop band Nazz – but even before he left that group, the depth and wide-encompassing nature of

Todd Rundgren’s ‘No World Order” at 25

Todd Rundgren has long made a career out of alternatively (and sometimes simultaneously) confounding and delighting his most ardent fans. Resolutely following his muse wherever it takes him, Rundgren is remarkably unbound from commercial considerations; he makes the music he wants to make, how and when he chooses. The result is a body of work

Album Mini-review: Todd Rundgren — An Evening with Todd Rundgren

File next to: Brian Wilson, Paul McCartney, Joe Jackson Rundgren has always been the most restless, resourceful and unpredictable of artists. It was two decades ago that he warned his days of releasing albums were over. That didn’t turn out to be the case. And he’s never made a secret of his general disdain of

Todd Rundgren Looks Over His Shoulder, Part Two

Continued from Part One… Bill Kopp: At certain points in your career, you’ve made it seem as if writing a hit is the easiest thing in the world for you, but at the same time you’ve made it clear that doing so isn’t something you find very interesting. What part or parts of the creative

Todd Rundgren Looks Over His Shoulder, Part One

Todd Rundgren‘s professional musical career began in the 1960s when he was guitarist for a Who-influenced Philadelphia group called Nazz. That group never found widespread commercial success, though one of their singles (the original version of Rundgren’s “Hello It’s Me”) was a hit in some markets. By the dawn of the 1970s, Rundgren had embarked