Capsule Reviews: Still More from Real Gone Music

Wrapping up the series (for now, at least), here’s the last of four entries presenting short looks at recently-released reissues and/or compilations from Real Gone Music. Vanilla Fudge – The Complete ATCO Singles Most rock fans with any sort of memory are familiar with Vanilla Fudge, and they know the band’s deceptively simple approach to

Capsule Reviews: And Yet Three More from Real Gone Music

Here’s the third of four collections of brief reviews of recently-released reissues and/or compilations from Real Gone Music. Dr. John, The Night Tripper – GRIS-gris Dr. John (aka Mac Rebbenack) was a well-known fixture on the New Orleans music scene long before he cut this, his debut album in 1968. And while he’d later enjoy

Capsule Reviews: Three More from Real Gone Music

Continuing from yesterday’s collection, here are more quick looks at recently-released reissues and/or compilations from Real Gone Music. Toomorrow: Original Soundtrack Album Seeing the names Harry Saltzman (of James Bond film fame) and Don Kirshner (of, well, Don Kirshner fame/infamy) emblazoned across the cover of this 1970 curio suggests we’re in for something that might

Capsule Reviews: Three from Real Gone Music

Because there’s so much of a backlog here at Musoscribe’s palatial new World HQ ( I moved recently), here’s the first of at least three collections of short reviews. These are all reissues or compilations on the Real Gone Music label, renowned (along with Rock Beat, Omnivore, Numero and a select few others) for their

Album Review: Phil “Fang” Volk — Rocker

Phil “Fang” Volk is best known as bassist for Paul Revere and the Raiders during their most high-profile era, roughly 1965-67. That’s him – the long-running group’s fourth in succession of bassists – you hear playing bass on essential cuts like “Steppin’ Out,” “Kicks,” the original version of “(I’m Not Your) Steppin’ Stone,” “Good Thing,”

It’s a Goolie Get-together!

A little over a year ago I was tapped to write liner notes for the first-ever reissue (on CD and vinyl) of The Munsters, a cash-in album that’s actually pretty good. That gig eventually led to me getting another assignment with a similar theme: the liner notes for Groovie Goolies. As readers of a certain

Dan Lacksman: The Electronic System Man

This feature appeared previously in Synth and Software. — bk This pioneering synthesist has worked with Bowie, Dolby, Deep Forest, and Kraftwerk’s Florian Schneider on what could be his final project. Daniel Lacksman was one of the first musicians in Belgium to own a synthesizer; he bought an EMS VCS3 in 1970. As a studio

Album Review: Bonniwell Music Machine

There’s an esteemed list of albums from the 1960s that didn’t get their due the first time around; the era was so rich with gems that plenty of great albums slipped by the public’s notice. For every Pet Sounds, Revolver and Days of Future Passed there’s an obscurity that – while it may not have

Album Review: Gordon Anderson — Moon Man

It’s sometimes said – and unfairly so – that people who are in the business side of the music business are essentially failed, frustrated musicians themselves. My own experience is different: some of my favorite musicians have a foot in both sides of the biz. It’s safe to assume that most if not all of

New Yorkers in Sheep’s Clothing: The Strangeloves Story (Part Three)

Continued from Part Two… Onstage, the band was a mix of incongruous elements. The typical American audience member of 1965 wouldn’t have known that Australia had neither zebras nor African drums. And things got ever weirder when the Strangeloves went on television. “We were on Hullabaloo,” Gottehrer recalls. “We were introduced by Sammy Davis Jr.,