tony levin Archive

King Crimson: Don’t Write an Epitaph Just Yet (Part Two)

Continued from Part One… Jakszyk explains the group’s current thinking. “We are embracing the music as a whole, and we are going back and we are playing things that have either not been played in decades, or that have never been played live, ever.” He mentions a suite of songs off one of the group’s

King Crimson: Don’t Write an Epitaph Just Yet (Part One)

Progressive rock giant King Crimson has a long and convoluted history. Founded in 1969 by iconoclastic guitarist Robert Fripp, the group has gone through numerous breakups, reorganizations and lineups of varying character. The current King Crimson configuration is generally considered to be its eighth, or perhaps an expanded version of is eighth: along with mainstay

Hundred-word Reviews for Nov./Dec. 2016, Part 9 of 10

Gary Ritchie – Poptimistic Style: powerpop Melodic, good-natured powerpop is the order of the day on Ritchie’s new album. Musical touchstones include the obvious ones (Beatles, Raspberries, Romantics) and some perhaps less obvious ones (he reminds me a good bit of Donnie Iris). There’s always room on my shelf for some quirk-free rock ‘n’ roll,

Back to Bassics: A Chat with Tony Levin

Among musicians, Tony Levin is as close as once can come to being a household name. Among the wider public, he’s not well known at all. That may be because recordings under his own name have had a relatively low profile, despite Levin’s having played on several hundred recordings with and by other artists. He’s

Hundred-word Reviews: New Rock/pop

More albums that deserve your time, but that I haven’t the time nor space to cover in a more in-depth fashion. Levin Minnemann Rudess – s/t This project brings together three of the busiest, most in-demand players on the scene today. Tony Levin (King Crimson) has played on literally thousands of sessions. Marco Minnemann is

Stick Man for Stick Men: The Pat Mastelotto Interview, Part 2

Continued from Part One… BK: This is an oversimplification, but bear with me. In rock, the drums pretty much keep the beat. In jazz, the beat is often implied. In progressive rock of the sort you do with Stick Men, your role seems to be somewhere in between, and the drums take on a role

Stick Man for Stick Men: The Pat Mastelotto Interview, Part 1

Though his major-label introduction to the rock world was as drummer for Mr. Mister, Pat Mastelotto’s résumé would subsequently include a staggering list of credits in a dizzying array of different projects. His work with King Crimson – as part of the renowned “double trio” configuration (on and off since around 1995) is perhaps his