steven wilson Archive

Album Review: Jethro Tull – Minstrel in the Gallery, 40th Anniversary La Grande Edition

The latest example of Ian Anderson‘s ongoing twofold mission (to encourage a modern-day reconsideration of Jethro Tull‘s back catalog, and to provide be-all-and-end-all versions of those albums) continues with Minstrel in the Gallery: 40th Anniversary La Grande Edition. The 1975 album spawned only one single a-side release (the title track, briefly appearing at #79 on

Album Review: Jethro Tull – WarChild, 40th Anniversary Theatre Edition

Jethro Tull‘s 1974 album WarChild occupies a curious place in the band’s history. Their previous album, 1973’s A Passion Play, had been roundly shellacked by critics. That album certainly had its fans; it made #1 on the charts, though that might have been a coattail effect of their earlier albums. But by the time of

Best of 2014: Compilations and Reissues

So here we are. It’s the last day of 2014. And it’s also the final day of posts looking back at my personal Best of 2014 lists. Today I’ll run down my favorite reissue/compilation/archival releases. As it happens, this is – as much as such a thing exists – my area of expertise: a significant

Album Review: Jethro Tull — A Passion Play: An Extended Performance

Unlike, say, Creedence Clearwater Revivial – or even The Beatles – Jethro Tull have rarely been anyone’s idea of a “singles group.” As the leading folk-prog group of the rock era, the Ian Anderson-led group released a steady line of albums, one a year from 1968-80. And many of those did spawn a single: seven

Best of 2013: New Music

So far this week, I’ve taken looks at my favorite album reissue/compilations; my favorite music-related DVDs; the best concerts of 2013; and three interview subjects who passed away this year. Today I wrap up the retrospective with a rundown of my five favorite new albums for 2013. Click on the titles for a full review

Album Review: King Crimson – Discipline (40th Anniversary Series Edition)

From their inception in 1969, King Crimson has always been about creating outside-the-box music that challenges (or simply ignores) convention. By the middle of the 1970s, the band had created at least two masterpieces: their debut album In the Court of the Crimson King and 1975’s Red. But after Red – when King Crimson was

Album Review: Jethro Tull – Aqualung 40th Anniversary Special Edition

A few weeks ago, Jethro Tull‘s highly regarded 1971 album Aqualung was released in a special 40th Anniversary package. But let’s be honest for a moment: this isn’t 1989 (by which time the CD format had completely taken over from vinyl) or 1993 (the year I finally broke down and bought a CD player). So

CD Review: Steven Wilson – Grace for Drowning

Leave it to Steven Wilson to create a solo album that manages to do several things at once, all successfully. This staggeringly busy man has spent his spare time(!) these last few years readying releases by his main band (Porcupine Tree) and his side-projects (a DVD from no-man, albums and videos from Blackfield, and overseeing

Two Years of Musoscribe: Steven Wilson

To celebrate the two-year anniversary of this blog, I’m taking the opportunity to look back over some of the more than five hundred blog entries I’ve posted. I’ve conducted interviews, written essays and reviewed new albums, reissues and DVDs. I’ve written a great deal about Steven Wilson and his myriad projects, and I’ve been fortunate

Album Review: Blackfield – Welcome to my DNA

It’s a common sentiment among music fans who’ve lived through the 60s, 70s or even 1980s: Music’s not as good as it used to be. They just don’t make it like they used to. While I understand that sentiment, I’m happy to report that nothing could be farther from the truth. There is some really