moody blues Archive

Denny Laine: McCartney’s Wingman is Still Flying (Part Two)

Continued from Part One … I started buying Wings albums when Band on the Run came out. I was 10. And as I followed the band, I began–even as a young kid, I began to get the sense that you were kind of a foil to Paul in that your presence in the group tended

Denny Laine: McCartney’s Wingman is Still Flying (Part One)

Denny Laine was a founding member of the Moody Blues, along with longtime members Ray Thomas and Mike Pinder. He left and went on to a solo career, working briefly with a Birmingham “supergroup” called Balls (also including future ELO keyboardist Richard Tandy, Plastic Ono Band drummer Alan White and Apple protege Jackie Lomax). Later

Album Review: The Moody Blues’ ‘Days of Future Passed’

This article appeared originally on BestClassicBands. There wasn’t a great deal of precedent – either within the group or on the pop music landscape – for Days of Future Passed when the Moody Blues recorded their (sort-of) debut album. The British quintet had only just reinvented itself with a new lineup and a new sound,

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A Look Back at ‘Days of Future Passed’ with Founding Moody Blues Ray Thomas and Mike Pinder

This feature appeared originally on BestClassicBands. When most people think of the Moody Blues, the group’s classic 1967 album Days of Future Passed immediately comes to mind. But the Birmingham, England-based group started out years earlier as an r&b outfit. Various members had played together in other bands; one calling itself the Krew Cats –

Best of 2015: Archival and Reissue Releases

This year has been another great one for reissues and compilations. As much as I delight in the discovery of new music, there remains a staggering backlog of music that has been around for years yet has escaped my notice. Or…maybe I just dig compilations of stuff I already know. Either way, here are my

Album Review: The Moody Blues — The Magnificent Moodies (Part 2)

Continued from Part One... The early Moody Blues certainly deserved better success than they found. Their lack of chart action was certainly a factor in Denny Laine‘s departure. But during his time with the group, The Moody Blues recorded enough material for another album in a pair of sessions (one day in July 1964 and

Album Review: The Moody Blues — The Magnificent Moodies (Part 1)

Not long ago I interviewed Moody Blues founding member/flautist/vocalist Ray Thomas; much of our conversation centered around a new box set documenting the group’s pre-Days of Future Passed material. That music originally took the form of a UK album called The Magnificent Moodies (issued around the same time stateside as Go Now: The Moody Blues

“Go Now” and Then: The Ray Thomas Interview, Part 2

Continued from Part One… Back in 1965, the original lineup of The Moody Blues did seem poised for bigger things: that year they played the prestigious and televised NME Poll Winners Concert, along with The Beatles, Rolling Stones, Animals, and Kinks. Those – and sessions for Thank Your Lucky Stars and Ready Steady Go aren’t

“Go Now” and Then: The Ray Thomas Interview, Part 1

The Moody Blues made their most indelible mark on pop music with the landmark LP Days of Future Passed. That concept album was one of the earliest successful combinations of light-classical music and rock. Though it was released in 1967 – the fertile period that also gave the world Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band