king crimson Archive

King Crimson: Don’t Write an Epitaph Just Yet (Part Two)

Continued from Part One… Jakszyk explains the group’s current thinking. “We are embracing the music as a whole, and we are going back and we are playing things that have either not been played in decades, or that have never been played live, ever.” He mentions a suite of songs off one of the group’s

King Crimson: Don’t Write an Epitaph Just Yet (Part One)

Progressive rock giant King Crimson has a long and convoluted history. Founded in 1969 by iconoclastic guitarist Robert Fripp, the group has gone through numerous breakups, reorganizations and lineups of varying character. The current King Crimson configuration is generally considered to be its eighth, or perhaps an expanded version of is eighth: along with mainstay

King Crimson: Iconoclastic Innovators

Note: This feature is based on an interview with King Crimson guitarist/vocalist Jakko Jakszyk. Stay tuned for another Crim feature — coming soon — based on interviews with Tony Levin and Pat Mastelotto. — bk After decades as a successful touring musician and recording artist, Jakko Jakszyk is fronting the band he discovered in 1969,

New Music Review Roundup, Part 2

Here’s the second of three collections of reviews. The Hangabouts – Kits & Cats and Saxon Wives Good-timing, cleverly-written melodic pop is what’s on offer on the latest album from the Hangabouts. It rocks a bit harder than their last outing, and there are hints of some of the more adventurous end of early 70s

Hundred-word Reviews January 2016: Prog

Today I’m serving up five more hundred-word reviews; today’s five all fit more or less into the progressive rock category, and they’re sourced from across this globe of ours. Mekaal Hasan Band – Andholan Talk about genre labels: I have some issues with the term “world music.” While often well-intentioned, it marginalizes most anything outside

Album Review: District 97 with John Wetton — One More Red Night

With exceedingly few exceptions, progressive rock is a man’s game. There’s certainly no law against women singing or playing in the style – Julie Slick, for example, is one of the best bassists around these days, irrespective of genre and gender – but the truth is that the progressive rock scene is one in which

Honeymoon Hundred-word Reviews, Part 1

I’m on my honeymoon this week, so I thought it would be a good time to offer up some backlog-clearing entries in my occasional series of Hundred Word Reviews. And though the musical styles are all over the map, there’s a theme of sorts this time: each of the acts reviewed has been covered previously,

Stick Man for Stick Men: The Pat Mastelotto Interview, Part 2

Continued from Part One… BK: This is an oversimplification, but bear with me. In rock, the drums pretty much keep the beat. In jazz, the beat is often implied. In progressive rock of the sort you do with Stick Men, your role seems to be somewhere in between, and the drums take on a role

Stick Man for Stick Men: The Pat Mastelotto Interview, Part 1

Though his major-label introduction to the rock world was as drummer for Mr. Mister, Pat Mastelotto’s résumé would subsequently include a staggering list of credits in a dizzying array of different projects. His work with King Crimson – as part of the renowned “double trio” configuration (on and off since around 1995) is perhaps his

Album Review: King Crimson – Discipline (40th Anniversary Series Edition)

From their inception in 1969, King Crimson has always been about creating outside-the-box music that challenges (or simply ignores) convention. By the middle of the 1970s, the band had created at least two masterpieces: their debut album In the Court of the Crimson King and 1975’s Red. But after Red – when King Crimson was