jon auer Archive

Big Star Lives! with “Live in Memphis” (Part 2)

Continued from Part One… As Jon Auer pointed out in metaphor form during our conversation, speaking of Big Star in a slightly different context, “You can write the greatest letter in the world to someone, but if the postman loses it, or doesn’t deliver it, and no one ever gets it, no one’s gonna know

Big Star Lives! with “Live in Memphis” (Part 1)

The story of Big Star – a band once so obscure, only critics, musicians and a small handful of in-the-know fans even knew of their brief existence – has now passed into popular culture. I’ve always considered myself a hardcore fan of their general style of music: back in the early- to mid-1970s, I was

Boots by George Harrison, Hair by Robert Smith: The Posies Interview, Part Five

Continued from Part Four… Bill Kopp: For a lot of people, myself included, Dear 23 and/or Frosting on the Beater are cited as the best Posies work. With Amazing Disgrace, you went in a much harder rocking direction. There wasn’t really anything on Failure that sort of hinted at that sort of future. Was the

Boots by George Harrison, Hair by Robert Smith: The Posies Interview, Part Four

Continued from Part Three… Bill Kopp: There’s a track of yours on Yellow Pills Volume 2, “Saying Sorry to Myself.” To my ears it has all the hallmarks of the first album. I like the way you take a bit of the lyric of “The Ballad of John and Yoko” and stand it on its

Boots by George Harrison, Hair by Robert Smith: The Posies Interview, Part Three

Continued from Part Two… Ken Stringfellow: Listening to Failure, it would be hard to tell what we were listening to. Because the album has a very sixties vibe to it, kind of like if some sixties beat group moved to California. But I can give you a breakdown that will show you where some of

Boots by George Harrison, Hair by Robert Smith: The Posies Interview, Part Two

Continued from Part One… Bill Kopp: I thought it was a nice bit of contextualization to include Veronika Kalmar‘s snarky and negative review in the liner notes of the Failure reissue. It might be tough for you to cast your minds back to that time, but how did you react when you first read it

Boots by George Harrison, Hair by Robert Smith: The Posies Interview, Part One

While grunge or alternative might be the first rock genres that spring to mind when one thinks of the 1990s, an unlikely group from the Pacific Northwest had already gained a foothold – both commercially and critically – with their brand of melodic guitar-based pop. The Posies – eventually a band, but originally just a