john lennon Archive

Music to Your Ears: John Lennon’s ‘Rock and Roll’

In 1972 John Lennon teamed up with notorious producer Phil Spector to record a collection of rock’n’roll oldies. Those sessions took place in L.A. during a period the ex-Beatle would describe as his “lost weekend,” a time of drunk and drugged carousing and general misbehavior. Making matters worse, when the sessions were completed, the mercurial

John Lennon: Five Sessions Outside the Beatles

More of my “Take Five”… John Lennon is rarely thought of as a session musician; nearly all of his work was within the context of The Beatles, with wife Yoko Ono and/or his own Plastic Ono Band. But between 1965 and his death in 1980, Lennon participated in several notable projects involving other artists. The

March Through Time: John Lennon

For many years after his tragic death, it was considered bad form to utter or write so much as a critical word on the subject of John Lennon’s body of work. His presence looms large in popular music to this very day, though he’s remembered primarily as a Beatle and a cultural icon. With the

Album Review: Jem Records Celebrates John Lennon

Today would have been John Lennon’s 80th birthday. Cover versions that stick very close to the original version have their place: witness the appeal of tribute bands. But beyond the hey-I-can-do-it angle, they’re more an exercise for the artist than a rewarding experience for the listener. Much better are reinventions, musical excursions whereby an artist

You Are Cordially Invited: John and Yoko’s ‘Wedding Album’ at 40

As the Beatles launched their punningly-named Apple Corps in 1967, the group also started a number of offshoot/subsidiary business lines. Apple Records would be the most well-known (and truly the only successful) of those, but there was, for a time, Apple Films (Magical Mystery Tour, Let it Be), Apple Publishing and an experimental record label,

Album Review: John and Yoko w/ Harry Smith: I’m Not the Beatles

Way back in 1990, author John Robertson published a provocative book called The Art & Music of John Lennon. The title might lead one to think it’s a coffee table book or somesuch; in fact it’s something much more weighty (metaphorically speaking, that is). Robertson’s central thesis – consistent with a largely unspoken viewpoint espoused