jethro tull Archive

Ian Anderson: System Latency and the Opportunities of Multimedia

British Progressive legends Jethro Tull have been around in one form or another for nearly half a century. From 1967 until now, the group’s mainstay has always been Ian Anderson: as songwriter, singer and flautist, Anderson has long cut a distinctive figure. His trademark standing-on-one-leg flute solos accent the band’s reliably high-energy performances. Even today

For Ian Anderson, It’s Not Just Another Day at the Office

Jethro Tull started out as a blues band; the group’s 1968 debut album This Was drew to a large degree upon jazz and blues styles. But under the leadership of founder Ian Anderson, Jethro Tull soon moved into a style of its own, a European folk-tinged kind of progressive rock. That approach served the band

Martin Barre: Clever and Complicated

“The thing that pleases me is melody,” says Martin Barre, lead guitarist for British folk-progressive rockers Jethro Tull from their 1969 Stand Up LP through the group’s dissolution. “If I can come up with some nice chords and a really melodic top line, that gives me great satisfaction.” Since that band ceased operations, Barre has

Hundred-word Reviews for February 2016, Part 1

Once again, it’s time for some hundred-word reviews. This first set spotlights five archival releases loosely falling into the prog subgenre. Greg Lake & Geoff Downes – Ride the Tiger We head pretty far into the prog-rock weeds for this one. Greg Lake (guitar, bass) of ELP got together with Geoff Downes (Buggles, Yes, Asia)

Concert Review: Martin Barre — Asheville NC, 3 December 2015

Maybe you’ve had this experience yourself: you have tickets to a show. You’re really looking forward to it. You know it’s going to be really good. Then you get there, the band comes on, and…it’s better than you expected. Way better. This happened to me last night. I am friends with the publicist who handles

Full-on Fun: Guitarist Martin Barre’s Post-Jethro Tull World

Ask most people who the leader of Jethro Tull was, and they say, “Why, Mr. Tull, of course!” No, that’s Ian Anderson you’re thinking of. But the mainstay of that group alongside the flutist/singer was ace guitarist Martin Barre. On all but the first of the band’s twenty-plus albums, it’s Barre’s fretwork that you’ll hear.

Hundred-word Reviews for September, Part 4 of 8

More quickie reviews today. Some familiar names, some not-so-well-known ones. All worth a spin. John Wetton – New York Minute This disc – recorded live at New York City’s Iridium in fall 2013 – has an odd, busman’s holiday quality about it. Though Wetton is pictured with a guitar, on the record he’s just singing.

Album Review: Jethro Tull – Minstrel in the Gallery, 40th Anniversary La Grande Edition

The latest example of Ian Anderson‘s ongoing twofold mission (to encourage a modern-day reconsideration of Jethro Tull‘s back catalog, and to provide be-all-and-end-all versions of those albums) continues with Minstrel in the Gallery: 40th Anniversary La Grande Edition. The 1975 album spawned only one single a-side release (the title track, briefly appearing at #79 on

Album Review: Jethro Tull – WarChild, 40th Anniversary Theatre Edition

Jethro Tull‘s 1974 album WarChild occupies a curious place in the band’s history. Their previous album, 1973’s A Passion Play, had been roundly shellacked by critics. That album certainly had its fans; it made #1 on the charts, though that might have been a coattail effect of their earlier albums. But by the time of

Best of 2014: Compilations and Reissues

So here we are. It’s the last day of 2014. And it’s also the final day of posts looking back at my personal Best of 2014 lists. Today I’ll run down my favorite reissue/compilation/archival releases. As it happens, this is – as much as such a thing exists – my area of expertise: a significant