jellyfish Archive

Fifty-word Reviews for July 2018, Part 1

For years now, I’ve engaged in an occasional series of reviews in which I limit myself to 100 words. The point isn’t at all to give short shrift to these fine releases; instead, it’s to cover albums that would otherwise go unmentioned only for lack of time. Speaking of time, all of these releases are

Hundred Word Reviews for March 2015, Part 5

For the final entry in this run of hundred-word reviews, I take quick looks at some rare and/or reissued music. I think it’s all worth your time. TV Eyes – TV Eyes TV Eyes was a 90s alternapop supergroup. Jason Falkner has a stunningly high quality catalog of his own. Roger Manning was a prime

Album Review: Jellyfish — Bellybutton and Spilt Milk

Nineteen-ninety was a curious year in rock music. The top hitmaking artists of the year included Madonna, Mariah Carey, Phil Collins, Michael Bolton, Paula Abdul, Janet Jackson. If you liked rock music and wanted to find it in the mass-consumption media (in other words, on radio), your choices were largely limited to Jon Bon Jovi,

Album Review: Jellyfish — Radio Jellyfish

It’s pointless (not to mention plain wrong) to argue against the assertion that the “unplugged” concept had played itself out by the middle of the 1990s. But the format – originally devised (with others) by Jules Shear – was itself a good one: stripped-down, intimate live performances of rock songs. That concept was oft-abused and

I’m in the Fan Club: A Conversation with Jellyfish’s Roger Manning, Part Two

Continued from Part One… Bill Kopp: I remember one of those live-in-the-studio sessions you did back around the time of the second album. It was for 99X, a radio station in Atlanta (WNNX-FM). The thing I remember most from the interview part of that session – and I don’t know if it was you or

I’m in the Fan Club: A Conversation with Jellyfish’s Roger Manning, Part One

Jellyfish was one of the great bands of the early 90s. At a time when pop music had lost its way – or at least moved away from the things that made it such a culturally vital part of previous times (most notably the 70s), the Jellyfish approach celebrated the bombast and excess of rock/pop,