ian anderson Archive

Ian Anderson: System Latency and the Opportunities of Multimedia

British Progressive legends Jethro Tull have been around in one form or another for nearly half a century. From 1967 until now, the group’s mainstay has always been Ian Anderson: as songwriter, singer and flautist, Anderson has long cut a distinctive figure. His trademark standing-on-one-leg flute solos accent the band’s reliably high-energy performances. Even today

For Ian Anderson, It’s Not Just Another Day at the Office

Jethro Tull started out as a blues band; the group’s 1968 debut album This Was drew to a large degree upon jazz and blues styles. But under the leadership of founder Ian Anderson, Jethro Tull soon moved into a style of its own, a European folk-tinged kind of progressive rock. That approach served the band

Hundred-word Reviews for February 2016, Part 1

Once again, it’s time for some hundred-word reviews. This first set spotlights five archival releases loosely falling into the prog subgenre. Greg Lake & Geoff Downes – Ride the Tiger We head pretty far into the prog-rock weeds for this one. Greg Lake (guitar, bass) of ELP got together with Geoff Downes (Buggles, Yes, Asia)

Full-on Fun: Guitarist Martin Barre’s Post-Jethro Tull World

Ask most people who the leader of Jethro Tull was, and they say, “Why, Mr. Tull, of course!” No, that’s Ian Anderson you’re thinking of. But the mainstay of that group alongside the flutist/singer was ace guitarist Martin Barre. On all but the first of the band’s twenty-plus albums, it’s Barre’s fretwork that you’ll hear.

Album Review: Jethro Tull – Minstrel in the Gallery, 40th Anniversary La Grande Edition

The latest example of Ian Anderson‘s ongoing twofold mission (to encourage a modern-day reconsideration of Jethro Tull‘s back catalog, and to provide be-all-and-end-all versions of those albums) continues with Minstrel in the Gallery: 40th Anniversary La Grande Edition. The 1975 album spawned only one single a-side release (the title track, briefly appearing at #79 on

Album Review: Jethro Tull – WarChild, 40th Anniversary Theatre Edition

Jethro Tull‘s 1974 album WarChild occupies a curious place in the band’s history. Their previous album, 1973’s A Passion Play, had been roundly shellacked by critics. That album certainly had its fans; it made #1 on the charts, though that might have been a coattail effect of their earlier albums. But by the time of

Best of 2014: Videos

With 1/1/15 mere days away, it’s time for Musoscribe’s annual best-of lists. These are – of course — wholly subjective, and reflect my tastes and interests. I viewed quite a few music-related DVDs this year, and while quite a few were excellent (and none truly awful), four stood out. As it happens, all four concern

DVD Review: Ian Anderson – Thick As A Brick Live in Iceland

In 2012, Jethro Tull leader Ian Anderson mounted a tour to promote his latest solo album, Thick As a Brick 2: What Ever Happened to Gerald Bostock? The tour and album both represented a high point in the recent musical activity of the ever-busy Anderson. I saw the Asheville date of that tour in my

Album Review: Jethro Tull — A Passion Play: An Extended Performance

Unlike, say, Creedence Clearwater Revivial – or even The Beatles – Jethro Tull have rarely been anyone’s idea of a “singles group.” As the leading folk-prog group of the rock era, the Ian Anderson-led group released a steady line of albums, one a year from 1968-80. And many of those did spawn a single: seven

Hundred-word Reviews July 2014, Part Three

I’m bound and determined to reduce the contents of my in-box to manageable levels, so this week I’ll be covering 25 albums, each adhering to a 100-word limit. Don’t mistake brevity for a negative review; these are all worthwhile releases. Today’s five – all new music – can all be labeled as progressive, though they