fuzztones Archive

Album Review: Various — In Fuzz We Trust

The premise alone is enough to set your head a-spinning. First, start with a bunch of sixties garage bands, the kind immortalized on the legendary Lenny Kaye-curated Nuggets album. Now flash forward to the 1980s and beyond, when a second wave of bands spring up in tribute to the garage/psych sound of yesteryear. Now flash

Fuzzy Memories: A Conversation with The Fuzztones’ Rudi Protrudi, Part Three

Continued from Part Two… Rudi Protrudi: We did a single in 1972 and our singer was very into Jethro Tull , and we did “Locomotive Breath” along with a lot of other stuff. He played flute, and he had the Ian Anderson thing down. Yeah, I like the song. And so when we started writing

Fuzzy Memories: A Conversation with The Fuzztones’ Rudi Protrudi, Part Two

Continued from Part One… Bill Kopp: Throughout The Fuzztones‘ history, you’ve again and again managed the tricky feat of writing new, original songs that fit the aesthetic of stuff from 1965-66. Is it a conscious effort to do that, or by now are you so immersed in the style that it just happens that way?

Fuzzy Memories: A Conversation with The Fuzztones’ Rudi Protrudi, Part One

Since 1980, The Fuzztones have been leaders in keeping the garage rock flame alive. Originally based in New York City, the group – led by singer-guitarist Rudi Protrudi – eventually emigrated to Germany, where they believe they’ve found a more receptive audience. There’s been a fair amount of Fuzztones-related activity in recent years; among the

Album Review: Illegitimate Spawn: The Fuzztones Tribute Album

The concept of Illegitimate Spawn chases its own tail: an international compilation of unknown groups playing cover versions in tribute to The Fuzztones, a group who are themselves essentially a tribute to Nuggets-style 60s music; it’s certainly not for everyone. As an incurable addict of the melodic end of sixties fuzz-drenched garagepunk, I’m not sure

Album Review: The Fuzztones – Horny as Hell

Now there’s a concept: take classic garage-punk songs from the 1960s (plus a fistful of Fuzztones originals) and put together new arrangements that add…wait for it…a horn section. No kidding. The Fuzztones have been at it for a long time, keeping the flames of 60s punk going. The hallmarks of that genre — snotty vocals,