emerson lake & palmer Archive

A Look Back at ELP with Carl Palmer, Part Three

Continued from Part Two … Bill Kopp: With the benefit of studio technology, bands in the early ’70s could overdub and make really dense, layered albums. Reproducing that sound onstage was another matter, especially for a three-piece, I would imagine … Carl Palmer: Of course we didn’t have MIDI in those days, so we couldn’t

A Look Back at ELP with Carl Palmer, Part Two

Continued from Part One … Bill Kopp: The term “supergroup” was just coming into use around the time ELP got started. And it certainly applied to you three, since each of you had achieved success in previous projects. I would imagine there were expectations placed upon you by the music press and so forth. Did

A Look Back at ELP with Carl Palmer, Part One

Late-breaking Author’s Note: Very shortly after I turned in this feature for publication — it ran in December on BLURT — news broke that Greg Lake had succumbed to cancer at age 69. Carl Palmer and I didn’t spend a lot of time discussing Greg specifically, but Carl did, as you’ll see, make repeated references

Hundred-word Reviews January 2016: Archival Live Albums

It’s time once again to take a stab at clearing out the massive backlog of worthy CDs clogging my inbox. Today, it’s quick reviews of five archival live albums, all previously unreleased. Cheap Trick – Auld Lang Syne By the tail-end of the 1970s (this show was recorded at Los Angeles’ Forum on New Year’s

Hundred-word Reviews: January 2015, Part 2

There’s a never-ending stream of new music, so it’s time once again for some hundred-worders to work off some of my backlog. As always, these all deserve full reviews, but with limited time and resources, 100 words will have to do. I’ll cut to the chase. Today it’s a wide assortment of music, from rock

DVD Review: Emerson, Lake & Palmer — Live at the Royal Albert Hall

Released (or more accurately, repackaged and re-released) in 2009, this is actually a live performance of Emerson, Lake and Palmer dating from 1992. As such, it’s dated in a number of ways. The opening makes use of late 80s/early 90s visual effects familiar to anyone who watched MTV during that era. And both Greg Lake