An American in London: The Shel Talmy Interview, Part Three

Continued from Part Two… Over the course of his career, Talmy worked with other highly regarded artists; most but not all of these were UK acts. His production credits include sides – and, more often than not, entire albums – by such well-known artists as Chad and Jeremy, Small Faces, Amen Corner, Pentangle, Bert Jansch

An American in London: The Shel Talmy Interview, Part Two

Continued from Part One… While Talmy was busy producing hits for The Who, The Kinks and others, he found time to produce quite a few lesser-known artists. As an independent producer, he saw his productions released on Andrew Loog Oldham’s Immediate, Pye, Columbia, Decca, London, Fontana, Atco and many others. He started his own label,

An American in London: The Shel Talmy Interview, Part One

In the history of rock and pop, it’s rare that a producer becomes a “rock star.” Certain names have become prominent fixtures in the audio part of pop culture: Phil Spector and George Martin are among the most well-known producers of the 1960s. In later years, Quincy Jones, Jeff Lynne, Brian Eno and Rick Rubin

Long Shot: The Story of Delaney & Bonnie’s ‘Motel Shot’ (Part 2)

Continued from Part One … The Motel Shot that finally saw release would consist almost completely of material from the studio sessions. On release, it fared well, reaching #65 on Billboard‘s album chart. A surprise hit single, “Never Ending Song of Love” rose to #13 on the singles charts. Even in its more refined state,

Long Shot: The Story of Delaney & Bonnie’s ‘Motel Shot’ (Part 1)

As the 1960s rolled over into 1970, popular music was undergoing a seismic shift. The full reasons aren’t totally clear; maybe it was the disillusionment in the wake of the assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert Kennedy. Perhaps it was the cumulative shock experienced at the daily news of the disastrous war in

Arthur Brown’s “Fire” Still Burns (Part 2)

Continued from Part One … Brown believes Tommy is “an amazing piece of work. But rock opera? I don’t buy it. There just isn’t a real name for it.” And so it was with the suite of songs on Side One of The Crazy World of Arthur Brown, with “Fire” as its centerpiece. Brown thinks

Arthur Brown’s “Fire” Still Burns (Part 1)

One of the most remarkable singles in a year full of remarkable music, 1968’s “Fire” was unlike most anything else on the radio. Backed with malevolent swirls of organ and brass punctuating a hard-driving arrangement, the operatic vocals of Arthur Brown made quite an impression on listeners. Opening with the memorable spoken (well, shouted) introduction

The Beth Hart Interview, Part 2: “It’s just about being fuckin’ honest and real.”

Continued from Part One … Bill Kopp: Wait a minute … did you just say 65 songs? Beth Hart: Oh, yeah. At first, you know, some people are better at learning things than others. Some people have really great memory, so they can just do it. And then with other people, it takes time. But

The Beth Hart Interview, Part 1: “If we have a bad show, no one’s going to die.”

Beth Hart is one of the most popular vocalist-songwriters working in the blues idiom today. But she doesn’t confine her work to one genre. Her latest album, Fire on the Floor is all over the place stylistically, and that’s meant in the best possible way. I interviewed Hart for a story that was scheduled to

Album Mini-review: The Feelies — In Between

File next to: Violent Femmes, Velvet Underground The choice of production aesthetic is everything on In Between, the Feelies‘ 6th album (and their second since ending their nearly two-decade hiatus). A deliberately quiet album, In Between favors acoustic guitars over electric; wood-block percussion over splashy cymbals, and hushed, breathy vocals. The net effect of those