Music and food: Frank Solivan’s Recipe for Camaraderie

“It’s like the old saying, ‘The way to a man’s heart is through his stomach,’” says mandolin player Frank Solivan. “If you have a good meal, everybody’s just a little more at ease. And when you hear them say, ‘Oh! Mmm, this is good,’ that’s just a whole ‘nother layer of the connective tissue between

Ra Ra Riot Move Away from Their Chamber-pop Origins

“What it really comes down to,” says Ra Ra Riot vocalist Wes Miles, “is that, as an artist, you don’t ever want to make the same record twice.” That thinking helps explain the abrupt stylistic change between the group’s second album, 2010’s baroque-flavored The Orchard, and 2013’s Beta Love. For that third album, and on

Album Review: Eric Ambel — Lakeside

Indie cred: it’s an elusive quality, one that most artists would be pleased to possess. Indie cred connotes a level of achievement that suggests one’s work is more than ephemeral, more than disposable, worth further investigation. Once you’ve got it, if you’re the real deal, you’ll hold onto it. One fine Exhibit A for this

Single Review: Dirty Sidewalks — “It’s Getting Better” b/w “Hey Girl”

Seattle-based Dirty Sidewalks recently released a 7” single worthy of a listen. The a-side, “It’s Getting Better,” has already gotten some commercial traction in one of the few forms that actually generates income for the artist: TV and/or film placement. Twenty-odd seconds of “Getting Better” played during Episode 11 of Season 6 on Showtime’s Shameless.

Album Review: Bobby Long — Ode

At only 30, Bobby Long has a deep catalog of work. After three self-released albums beginning with 2009’s Dirty Pond Songs, he signed with ATO Records and began a string of releases for that label: two EPs to date, and two full-lengths. The latest of his albums is Ode to Thinking, released in 2015 on

Album Review: The Deadly Ones — It’s Monster Surfing Time

Two of pop culture’s kitschiest phenomenons collide on this new reissue of an ultra-rare LP from 1964. Not counting revivals and renewed interest, surf rock was popular from about 1962 to ’64 (a year that – not at all coincidentally – The Beatles took off in America). Originally centered around southern California, the style quickly

Album Review: Sammy Walker — Brown Eyed Georgia Darlin’

The pop music world has long been on a quest for the Next Fill-in-the-blank. After The Beatles stormed American shores, the rush was on to sign every band with a British accent. When The Knack hit it big with “My Sharona,” record company execs appeared – contract in hand – to sign any group with

Hieroglyphics’ Original Lineup Returns to the Road

Socially conscious hip-hop pioneers Hieroglyphics have withstood the test of time ever since their formation in mid-’90s Oakland. And while the collective’s most high-profile emcee remains Del the Funky Homosapien, all nine members have thriving careers both in and outside the group. “Each person has his own unique perspective,” says co-founder Opio, who’s also one

Larry Keel’s Asheville Experience

“I grew up playing bluegrass; it’s in my blood like crazy,” says guitarist, singer and songwriter Larry Keel. “But these days when I’m writing, I don’t hear bluegrass anymore. I’ve written and performed music that is, I think, unclassifiable. And that’s where I want to be.” Keel continues to defy pigeonholing with Experienced, his 15th

Album Mini-review: Bill Pritchard — Mother Town Hall

File next to: Ray Davies, Lloyd Cole, Martin Newell Despite having released nine albums since 1987, England-based Bill Pritchard isn’t well-known at home , much less here in the USA: he’s developed a sizable following in France, of all places. His music has the wry storytelling vibe of Nick Lowe, and his expressive baritone has