vinyl Archive

Album Reviews: Two Various-Artists RSD Releases

The Other Side of Sun, Part 2 Sun Records had seen its heyday come and go by the time Shelby Singleton bought the label in the late 1960s. But purchase he did. And with that, Sun became part of an impressive catalog that included plenty of hits in a wide variety of genres. Even though

Album Reviews: Cocteau Twins’ ‘Head Over Heels’ and ‘Treasure’

Not to be confused with Thompson Twins, Cocteau Twins were a dream-pop band form Scotland. Between 1982 and 1996 the group released nine albums of original music, including a 1996 collaborative disc with sometime Brian Eno associate Harold Budd. Cocteau Twins’ sound was a distinctive, gauzy melange that often sounded as if it had been

Album Review: Gary Numan – Dance

Casual listeners’ knowledge of Gary Numan’s body of work often doesn’t extend his hit single “Cars,” a track from his 1979 solo debut The Pleasure Principle. And that’s unfortunate, because Numan’s work has been consistently fascinating. He has released 20 solo albums to date (including two collaborative releases) and his most recent, 2017’s Savage (Songs

Album Review: Pocket Fishrmen – The Greatest Story Ever Told

Wow; here’s a weird one. Imagine, if you will, that Dead Kennedys were a comedy band. One from Austin, Texas. Now imagine that they stayed together for three decades, making bratty songs with provocative titles (“Amy Carter,” “Mommanatrix,” “”Flaccid is the Night,” “Priapus Power,” “Go Go Saddam Hussein” … you get the idea. Now imagine

Album Review: Fovea — Pencil Me In

The blippy synth lines that open “Boss Boy” suggest that Fovea’s Pencil Me In is going to be a synthpop album. But not; that impression is corrected after about, oh, three seconds. A gauzy wash of squalling guitars crashes over the synth. Okay, so it’s a shoegaze record, right? Wrong. The guitars recede, leaving behind

Album Review: Helen Kelter Skelter — Melter

The members of the cleverly-named band Helen Kelter Skelter may not wish that it were so, but they may well be destined to be known as “that other band from Oklahoma.” There’s not a whole lot of information floating freely on the interwebs, so listeners are left to form impressions of the group the old

Vinyl Roundup Part Two

Today I take a look at four simply superb reissue/compilations, all on vinyl. Don’t Look Now Original Soundtrack (Waxworks) Don’t Look Now was a 1973 thriller starring Donald Sutherland and Julie Christie, two of the era’s hottest actors. The film, directed by Nicolas Roeg (The Man Who Fell to Earth) is based on Daphne du

Vinyl Roundup Part One

Here’s a look at four new releases, all on my format of choice: vinyl. The Toadies – The Lower Side of Uptown (Kirtland Records) In an era populated by sensitive, navel-gazing neo-alt-folk-Americana acts, it’s refreshing to stumble upon a new release from a band that rocks like in the Old Days™. The Lower Side of

Reviews: 12 Jazz Reissues (Part Two)

Alphonse Mouzon – In Search of a Dream (MPS) Powerhouse fusion drummer Mouzon made his name on sides by Les McCann (the stunning Invitation to Openness) and Weather Report’s debut, but it was with Larry Coryell’s 11th House that he gained top-level fame. This, the sixth album under his name, is guaranteed to please fans

Reviews: 12 Jazz Reissues (Part One)

Albert Ayler Quartet – Copenhagen Live 1964 (hatOLOGY) The music of tenor saxophonist Albert Ayler (1936-1970) is assuredly not for the jazz novitiate. With an approach that makes Ornette Coleman sound mainstream, Ayler pushed even the boundaries of free jazz. Released in cooperation with the musician’s estate, this never-before-heard live session from more than a