review Archive

Album Review: Nick Mason’s Saucerful of Secrets — Live at the Roundhouse

In the 21st century, it’s not a bit unusual for well-known and celebrated music artists to tour o nthe strength of material they recorded and released a half century ago. As fine as 2019’s Who might be as an album, few bought concert tickets with a goal of hearing material from it, Endless Wire or

Album Review: The Black Watch – Fromthing Somethat

It’s difficult to keep up with the steady stream of output from The Black Watch. Just last year the group led by John Andrew Fredrick released a pair of albums – the 31 Years of Obscurity compilation and the all new Magic Johnson. Those were followed in short order by Brilliant Failures, reviewed in April.

DVD Review: Street Survivors: The True Story of the Lynyrd Skynyrd Plane Crash

The history of rock music is littered with tragic tales of disaster and death. Chief among those is the 1977 plane crash that killed two members of Lynyrd Skynyrd as well as a backing vocalist, the band’s assistant road manger and the two-man flight crew. At the time of the tragedy, the group was at

Album Review: Parish Hall — s/t

One of the longest lists that exists is the one noting recordings that were overlooked because there was simply too much good music already happening. It’s a delight – especially for a listener who enjoys musical styles whose time has (officially, any way) come and gone – to discover a long lost, previously unheard gem

Album Review: Chris Stamey & the Fellow Travelers – A Brand-New Shade of Blue

Chris Stamey first earned well-deserved fame for launching Car Records, the label that released Chris Bell’s solo single. His work with The dBs is, of course, extraordinary. His solo body of work, equally so. As a key part of the Big Star tribute concerts, he shone brightly as well. But with few exceptions, all of

Album Review: Librarians With Hickeys – Long Overdue

I’m a pushover for the big, chiming guitar sound that characterized Big Star and many of the “paisley underground” (or Children of Nuggets, if you prefer) bands that eventually followed in their wake. And a mere five seconds into “Until There Was You,” the opening track on Librarians With Hickeys’ Long Overdue, I knew I

Album Review: The Greyboy Allstars with Fred Wesley — West Coast Boogaloo

The Greyboy Allstars have a rich history. Funded more than 25 years ago, the soul jazz group came together originally to work as a backing band for DJ Greyboy, a major figure in the deep groove scene. The band continues to this day – with nearly the same personnel as when it began – and

Album Review: Blaine Campbell and the California Sound – Under the Tidal Wave

It’s no small feat to create a body of work that is simultaneously (a) chiefly inspired by the work of one particular artist and (b) distinctive and artistically significant on its own merits. The Spongetones did it with their series of Beatles-inspired albums, earning them both a spot on the Children of Nuggets compilation and

Album Review: Various Artists — Double Whammy!

Nuggets did it first, and Nuggets did it best: the early ‘70s 2LP compilation curated by Lenny Kaye brought together a widely disparate collection of underappreciated songs from the ‘60s, applying a label to those songs that somehow made sense, even if The Amboy Dukes’ “Journey to the Center of the Mind” had nothing in

Hello Hello: A Look Back at Caravan’s Second Album (at Fifty)

Rock fans who bought LPs in the late ‘60s and early 1970s may recall that some labels made use of the records’ inner sleeves as means to hype their other offerings. Certainly more elegant than the You-may-also-enjoy* hype that Capitol applied to back covers of Beatles LPs for a time, these full color inner sleeves