powerpop Archive

Boots by George Harrison, Hair by Robert Smith: The Posies Interview, Part Two

Continued from Part One… Bill Kopp: I thought it was a nice bit of contextualization to include Veronika Kalmar‘s snarky and negative review in the liner notes of the Failure reissue. It might be tough for you to cast your minds back to that time, but how did you react when you first read it

Boots by George Harrison, Hair by Robert Smith: The Posies Interview, Part One

While grunge or alternative might be the first rock genres that spring to mind when one thinks of the 1990s, an unlikely group from the Pacific Northwest had already gained a foothold – both commercially and critically – with their brand of melodic guitar-based pop. The Posies – eventually a band, but originally just a

Everything Comes Together: The Paul & John Interview, Part Three

Continued from Part Two… The album that would become Inner Sunset was announced in 2013, but the project’s gestation was a lengthy process, especially when compared to the quick, DIY measure employed by most other artists on the Mystery Lawn label. “Several factors contributed to the album taking so long to come out,” John Moremen

Everything Comes Together: The Paul & John Interview, Part Two

Continued from Part One… Speaking of the process of songwriting, the songs on The Paul & John‘s Inner Sunset are truly the product of a collaborative approach between Paul Myers and John Moremen. “When we originally started working on The Paul & John stuff, Paul was writing lyrics for some of my music,” explains Moremen.

Everything Comes Together: The Paul & John Interview, Part One

Music lovers who appreciate highly melodic and memorable rock-based songs – the kind of instantly hummable tunes that stick in your head long after the song is over – should take heart: though the style (however you might label it) doesn’t top the music 2014 charts, the style is far from moribund. In fact, San

Album Review: Sloan — Commonwealth

Rock fans who fall into a certain age bracket may recall the buzz around the release of Liz Phair‘s major-label debut, 1993’s Exile in Guyville. As the popular story went, the album was a track-by-track feminist response to The Rolling Stones‘ 1972 double LP Exile on Main Street. Or something like that; on close examination,

Album Review: The Legal Matters

My friend Bruce Brodeen occasionally endures some good-natured ribbing for those mini-reviews he penned in his NotLame mail order catalogs of the 90s. If you viewed his writing a certain way, it seemed like he thought everything was great. But I’m reminded of the (possibly apocryphal) conversation between a fan and Raymond Burr of TV’s

Book Review: Power Pop Prime, Vol. 3

Powerpop fans are in some ways like metal fans. They – or shall I say we – are hardcore fanatics of a narrow slice of the pop music spectrum, and the rest of the world looks on wondering what the fuss is all about: “What’s the appeal?” I come here today not to try to

Album Review: The Grip Weeds – Inner Grooves

Longtime fans of The Who may agree that despite its piecemeal nature, Odds and Sods ranks among their best efforts. Freed from the constraints of a unifying thematic approach, that album instead collected a bunch of excellent songs that hadn’t gotten the attention they deserved upon original release. And that’s the approach employed by The

Album Review: American Professionals — We Make It Our Business

Opinions vary – they’re in fact quote polarized on the issue – but people seem to either love or hate powerpop. While at its worst, it’s weak and derivative, at its best, powerpop expresses a sort of exuberance that few other types of music can communicate. When it’s insipid, it suffers from being what the