new release Archive

Album Review: Strand — Can’t Trust the Rain

Some of the most enduring rock has come out of Ireland. The Emerald Isle has given us Van Morrison, The Undertones, Thin Lizzy’s Phil Lynott, and even U2 (if you’re so inclined). For a country with a population of less than five million – for comparison, that’s slightly more people than live within the city

Sadler Vaden is Getting ‘Out There’ (Part Two)

Continued from Part One … Both Kevn and Jason make pretty plain their perspective on “big issues,” things beyond music. And those perspectives really do inform the music that they make. Some of those kinds of concerns find their way into your lyrics as well. In that regard, what do you see as your responsibility

Sadler Vaden is Getting ‘Out There’ (Part One)

Guitarist Sadler Vaden has been a member of Jason Isbell’s 400 Unit since 2013. He’s part of the Grammy-winning team that made 2015’s Something More Than Free and the band’s 2017 album The Nashville Sound, both of which earned Album of the Year awards at the Grammys. Each of those albums spawned a single that

Album Review: John Primer & Bob Corritore – The Gypsy Woman Told Me

Certain cities have a well-deserved reputation for their blues. The Midwestern metropolises of St. Louis, Memphis and Chicago (among others) have rich blues traditions. And the sounds coming out of those cities often bear the stamp of their origin. San Jose, California might not be one of the first cities that comes to mind when

Album Review: Chris Shutters — Good Gone Bad

Still in his 30s, Ohio guitarist Chris Shutters has already made a name for himself. After winning a series of blues and singer-songwriter competitions, he released his solo debut, A World Apart, in 2009. In 2013 he recorded and released a follow-up, Laugh and Roll the Moon. He’s toured with Ginger Baker’s son Kofi Baker

Album Review: Bobby Hatfield — Stay With Me

The history of popular music is scattered with tales of aborted projects, albums that for one reason or another never saw the light of day. Though it finally saw a kind of official release in the 21st century, the Beach Boys’ SMiLE is perhaps the most famous white whale of them all. And in that

Album Review: America — Heritage II

Back when I was growing up, liking the music of the band America was something one pretty much kept to himself. They didn’t exactly rock, and though their vocals sometimes sounded a lot like Neil Young, they never had anywhere near his hip quotient. But there was no denying the appeal of their breezy, well-crafted

Book Review: Laurence Myers — Hunky Dory: Who Knew?

When you get right down to it, everybody has a story to tell. Some tales have almost universal appeal, while others are possessed of niche quality. And there’s not really a direct correlation between how compelling or engrossing a story might be and the likelihood that one can score a book deal to write it.

Album Review: Dave Stryker — Blue Soul

Dave Stryker’s a busy guy. In 2014 he released Eight Track, a sort of conceptually unified collection of covers, non-jazz tunes rendered in the jazz idiom and featuring his electric guitar and some tasty vibraphone. Even though that set was something like his 18th album, Stryker seems to have felt he hit a kind of

Album Reviews: Various Artists — The Big Stir Singles Series

Back in the days when it still actually played music videos, MTV put together a promo clip featuring David Bowie. The Thin White Duke smiled rakishly at the camera and intoned, “Too much is never enough.” And to make sure viewers got the point, Billy Idol, Cyndi Lauper and The Police told them the same.