garage Archive

Album Review: Ty Segall — Ty Rex

Modern-day garage rock hero Ty Segall has never been bashful about showing his roots. Listening to both his original material and his musical contributions to others’ work (most notably Mikal Cronin), it’s quite easy to connect the dots: there’s a clear progression from teenage 1960s garage rock groups to The Stooges to Lenny Kaye‘s Nuggets

Album Mini-review: Motobunny — Motobunny

File next to: The Bangles, Amboy Dukes, Joan Jett It’s quite a tightrope walk to create music that rocks hard – really hard – yet maintains a strong, hooky, singalong kind of vibe. Motobunny manages it; fronted by two women and with a three-man backline, the group combines the sneering energy of Detroit rock (Stooges,

November 100-word Reviews, Part 5

My current crop of hundred-word reviews wraps up with some odds and ends, all worth a listen. I generally don’t review from MP3 files, but in a few cases I make exceptions. Three of those are here. Fischer’s Flicker – Fornever and Never Scott Fischer operates under this nom de pop to make his uptempo,

DVD Review: Escala Musical TV 1966-67

I took three years of Spanish in high school – seemingly a thousand years ago, more like thirty – and to this day I can correctly pronounce the items on a Mexican restaurant menu and/or say things that will get my face slapped (though hopefully not at the same time). That’s about my skill level.

The Chocolate Watchband: Give the People What They Want (Part 2)

Continued from Part One… Chocolate Watchband guitarist Tim Abbott believes that these new versions of the band’s old songs are an “opportunity for us to rewrite history, to make it right.” Because any way you slice it, Richard Polodor‘s “Expo 2000” which leads off the new disc, is a pretty ace psychedelic instrumental, well worth

The Chocolate Watchband: Give the People What They Want (Part 1)

Among aficionados of 1960s garage and psychedelic music, The Chocolate Watchband is dearly loved. Though the band’s history is – even by the standards of that era – a mightily convoluted one, the band (and its ersatz versions; more on that subject shortly) left behind some durable music that captures the 1960s zeitgeist. In many

Album Mini-review: Wizzz! French Psychedelic 1966-1969 Volume 1

File Next to: Nuggets II: British Empire and Beyond, Roman Coppola’s CQ Soundtrack France has long been notorious for its musical insularity. Listen to a bootleg of the Beatles‘ February 1964 show – the height of worldwide Beatlemania – and you can hear the group just fine; the Parisians merely clap. And they simply couldn’t

Six Years of Musoscribe: The British Invasion

In February 1964, The Beatles landed in America. And everything changed. In the wake of the Beatles’ Stateside success – from the launchpad of The Ed Sullivan Show – the floodgates opened, and a bunch of other British groups rushed onto the American pop landscape. Over the course of my music journo career, I’ve had

Some Long-lost Artist Biographies

Way back in the depths of the Great Recession (2007-2009), one of my former writers (from my time as Editor in Chief of a now-defunct magazine I won’t dignify by naming) put me in touch with the good people at Amoeba Music. The California-based record chain had an ambitious plan: creating artist bios to serve

Album Review: The Standells — Live on Tour 1966!

The Standells – considered a quintessential protopunk band of the 1960s – got their start as a matching-suited, club band playing frat-rock and covers of the day. The pride of Boston thanks to their name-checking 1966 hit, “Dirty Water,” The Standells weren’t even from Massachusetts; they were a Los Angeles group. But with the passing