garage Archive

Capsule Reviews for May 2017, Part One

Thank You, Friends (Concord Bicycle Music) I remember a time when seemingly nobody knew about Big Star; happily for me, that was about the time I found “new old stock” vinyl copies of #1 Record and Radio City in a local record store. I was immediately hooked. As is its character, Big Star’s Third album

Album Reviews: Three Standells Reissues

From one point of view, The Standells were opportunists. As that story goes, they got their start as a smiling, suited pop group, only changing their sound and collective demeanor once they took a new reading as to which way the pop culture winds were blowing. Moreover, that argument goes, they weren’t even from Boston,

The Mystery Lights: Straight Outta the Garage

While some of the harder, more jagged sub-styles of 1960s rock are now justly celebrated, back in the day many of those groups languished in obscurity; the popularity of Nuggets and similarly-themed compilations belies the reality that – on initial release – garage rock didn’t often sell in large quantities. For every “96 Tears,” there

Album Mini-review: Doug Tuttle — It Calls On Me

File next to: Tame Impala, Plasticland, Starling Electric On his self-titled 2014 debut, Doug Tuttle staked out his musical territory: a shimmering, woozy, yet highly tuneful 21st century take on the gentler side of mid 1960s psychedelic rock. Deftly sidestepping overtly retro production flourishes yet knowingly nailing the era’s vibe, he sounded like a slightly

Album Mini-review: Homme — Homme

File Next to: KT Tunstall, The Roches, Radiohead With electric guitars (run through a Leslie speaker cabinet and other assorted effects) and close yet vocal-acrobatic harmonies, the experimental yet inviting sonic approach of this Chicago duo suggests an otherworldly combination of Nirvana and The Roches. Just when you think they’re going to be some kind

Album Mini-review: The Roaring 420s – You Can’t Get Out Alive

File next to: Elephant Stone, Allah-Las, Fuzztones For The Roaring 420s, everything old is new again. Across the twelve songs on *You Can’t Get Out Alive – their second full-length – this Dresden, Germany based quintet crafts original songs that bear more than a whiff (or a toke if you like) of late 1960s psychedelia.

Album Review: Ty Segall — Ty Rex

Modern-day garage rock hero Ty Segall has never been bashful about showing his roots. Listening to both his original material and his musical contributions to others’ work (most notably Mikal Cronin), it’s quite easy to connect the dots: there’s a clear progression from teenage 1960s garage rock groups to The Stooges to Lenny Kaye‘s Nuggets

Album Mini-review: Motobunny — Motobunny

File next to: The Bangles, Amboy Dukes, Joan Jett It’s quite a tightrope walk to create music that rocks hard – really hard – yet maintains a strong, hooky, singalong kind of vibe. Motobunny manages it; fronted by two women and with a three-man backline, the group combines the sneering energy of Detroit rock (Stooges,

November 100-word Reviews, Part 5

My current crop of hundred-word reviews wraps up with some odds and ends, all worth a listen. I generally don’t review from MP3 files, but in a few cases I make exceptions. Three of those are here. Fischer’s Flicker – Fornever and Never Scott Fischer operates under this nom de pop to make his uptempo,

DVD Review: Escala Musical TV 1966-67

I took three years of Spanish in high school – seemingly a thousand years ago, more like thirty – and to this day I can correctly pronounce the items on a Mexican restaurant menu and/or say things that will get my face slapped (though hopefully not at the same time). That’s about my skill level.