Monthly Archive:: October 2012

45rpm Roundup

The 45rpm vinyl format isn’t dead. In fact, I see more of those little seven-inchers in my mailbox these days than I did even a couple of years ago. Here I take a look at four recent submissions. None is at all musically like the others, and seven out of the eight songs are highly

DVD Review: Johnny Winter – Live From Japan

There’s no point in tip-toeing around it: blues guitarist Johnny Winter is old and frail. The cumulative effects of decades of drug and alcohol abuse/addiction (happily, he’s clean now) coupled with the medical problems associated with albinism make the odds unlikely that Winter would even still walk this Earth at age 68. But indeed he

DVD Review: The Move – The Lost Broadcasts

The Move are one of those sixties groups that got lost in the transatlantic shuffle. They arguably had it all: great songwriting, strong vocalists, an a ready-made visual image. A near-perfect mix of super-catchy pop melodicism, heavier-than-heavy riffage, ambitious art-pop leanings and a penchant for controversy, The Move should have been huge in the USA.

Moogfest 2012 Preview

Moogfest kicks off this evening. For me the highlights – -and the acts I’ll be reporting on — will most likely include Morton Subotnick, Primus, Black Moth Super Rainbow, (possibly) Explosions in the Sky, The Magnetic Fields, Thomas Dolby, and perhaps more. Meanwhile, an old friend contacted me this morning to let me know about

Album Review: Shoes – 35 Years: The Definitive Shoes Collection 1977-2012

As Shoes bassist John Murphy told me in our wide-ranging four-part interview, the new 21-cut compilation on Real Gone Music, 35 Years: The Definitive Shoes Collection 1977-2012 is “is a sort of Part Two to Shoes Best,” the 1987 collection released on Shoes’ own Black Vinyl Records. That’s about right; assuming one doesn’t plan to

A Really Big Shoes Interview, Part 4

Continued from Part Three… Bill Kopp: So Ignition is the first new Shoes album in 17 years. It’s an obvious question, but why so long? John Murphy (bass/vocals): It sounds terrible: eighteen years. And of course there was never any grand plan. I think, when I look back at what was happening in the late

A Really Big Shoes Interview, Part 3

Continued from Part Two… Bill Kopp: I think Shoes fans – especially ones outside the Midwest – think of you more as a studio band. Why don’t you play out more, or tour? John Murphy (bass/vocals): Going back to Elektra again, the labels in those days didn’t have much to do with a band’s live

A Really Big Shoes Interview, Part 2

Continued from Part One… Bill Kopp: I bought the Present Tense LP when it came out; I was 13 (fifteen; Math is hard! — bk). Gary Klebe‘s “I Don’t Miss You” got a decent amount of airplay on the rock FM station in Atlanta. Did you have huge hopes for high-profile mainstream commercial blockbuster success

A Really Big Shoes Interview, Part 1

Shoes are that curious breed: a powerpop band that’s consistently lauded critically, but that makes only occasional modest commercial inroads. They’ve been plying their trade – catchy, muscular, hook-filled rock with stellar vocal harmonies – since the mid-1970s. The band seemed poised for breakout fame – possibly as the Next Big Thing after The Cars

Coming Attractions

Between day-job commitments, (happy) personal matters, and blog-related travel, these are busy days at Musoscribe World Headquarters. My goal is to deliver fresh, new content – usually 500-1000 words – every business day. And for more than three years going, I’ve kept to that goal nearly every day. Every rare so-often, however, I just don’t