Album Review: Wes Montgomery — The Classic Recordings 1958-1960

The world’s a much smaller place today than it was a quarter century ago. When I frequented record stores – even once the CD era began – import albums were pricey. They simply weren’t in the budget of the average music consumer in the United States. Things are very different now, thanks in no small

Wes Montgomery’s ‘In the Beginning’ from Resonance Records (Part 2)

Continued from Part One… At right: Recording rehearsal. David Baker, David Young, Dr. Larry Ridley, Wes Montgomery. Photograph by Duncan Schiedt. And still there’s more: shortly before his 2014 passing, famed Indianapolis photojournalist Duncan Schiedt contacted Resonance’s Zev Feldman to share news that he had a 1959 recording of Wes Montgomery with the Eddie Higgins

Wes Montgomery’s ‘In the Beginning’ from Resonance Records (Part 1)

Resonance Records is not your typical record label. While they do release a steady stream of solid new music from today’s jazz artists, that’s not what makes them truly special. Their tireless and thorough efforts behind the scenes to bring previously-unheard music to modern-day listeners is their most important mission, and it’s one of historic

Album Review: Wes Montgomery – Echoes of Indiana Avenue

Occasionally, when it comes to archival and/or rare recordings, the back-story can be as compelling as the music itself. The circumstances surrounding the recording session, the method of recording, and the saga of how a long-lost tape surfaces after years: these can, sometimes, be the stuff of legend. For the sort of person who finds

Album Review: Wes Montgomery – Boss Guitar

Let’s face facts: making music is a commercial endeavor. And don’t let any musician tell you different; if they do, they’re either starving for their art (perhaps literally) or in possession of a financial situation such that financial considerations are a minor issue. Since the beginning of music as a component of popular culture —

EP Review: Deb Montgomery — All the Water

A moody, contemplative vibe is on display within the title track of Pacific Northwest folk rocker Deb Montgomery’s latest EP, All the Water. There’s a gothic storytelling feel to the song, and the instrumentation builds as the song unfolds. Starting out quietly and with sparse accompaniment, Montgomery builds the arrangement with more instruments, punctuated by

Album Review: Eddie Roberts’ West Coast Sounds – It’s About Time

What’s that you say? You want some new music that features the expert precision and passion of jazz, and the oomph and fire of rock, but you don’t want the fussiness and self-absorption that sometimes comes with prog? Well, have I got some music for you. I first discovered Leeds, England-based The New Mastersounds back

Adi the Monk: The ‘Cosmic Thread” Running Though His Music

Asheville’s music community features an impressive number of unique personalities. But it’s safe to say that only one has a personal history that includes a period spent as a Vaishnava monk. Ādi Puruṣa Das performs and records as Adi the Monk, making instrumental music that – on the surface at least – has little to

Album Review: King Solomon Hicks – Harlem

Opening with Leon Russell’s “I’d Rather Be Blind” underscores the point that King Solomon Hicks is no blues purist. His reading of the song – first cut by Freddie King in 1972 on his Russell-produced Texas Cannonball – owes a debt to the kind of blues played by the Mad Dogs and Englishmen aggregation. And

Hundred-word Reviews for January 2020

Every so often – pretty often, in fact – I find a stack of CDs has accumulated on my desk. They’ve made the cut as albums deemed worthy of sharing with my readers. In the space of just one hundred words, I endeavor to convey what’s noteworthy or even special about these releases. Each of