How You Gonna See Me in 40 Years: a Look Back at Alice Cooper’s ‘From the Inside’

Alice Cooper (the individual born Vincent Furnier, not the band) was a notorious carouser and a founding member of the Hollywood Vampires softball team/drinking club. Cooper was part of the ragtag and debauched collective of idle rich rock stars who frequented Los Angeles bars and clubs; that motley crew also included – at various times

Alice Cooper: The Musoscribe Interview

As the title of yesterday’s feature indicates, Alice Cooper is the Grand Old Man of shock rock. Nearly a half century after the release of the debut album Pretties for You, Cooper remains busy as ever; he’s been recording and performing with supergroup Hollywood Vampires, and his most recent album, Paranormal, finds him reuniting with

Alice Cooper: The Grand Old Man of Shock Rock

At its core, rock ‘n’ roll has always been about youthful rebellion. From the national debut of Elvis Presley — who was initially shown on television waist-up so as not to offend delicate sensibilities with his shaking hips — to transgressive modern-day artists like Marilyn Manson and GWAR, part of rock music’s mission has to

Album Review: Alice Cooper – Muscle of Love (SACD)

Dedicated fans of 1970s rock know that Alice Cooper means two different things: there’s the vocalist born Vincent Furnier, and there’s the group he fronted from the late 1960s (when they were known as The Spiders) through 1973. Though post-’73 albums were released bearing the name Alice Cooper, those (with the exception of 1974’s Greatest

Album Review: Alice Cooper — Billion Dollar Babies

On the occasion of its 2014 reissue on Hybrid SACD, Alice Cooper’s Billion Dollar Babies is due for a critical second-look. Originally released in 1973, Billion Dollar Babies was Cooper’s sixth LP, and the second-to-last to feature the original band. Though by the time of Babies, ace session guitarists Steve Hunter and Dick Wagner were

Album Review: Alice Cooper – Dada

For 1982’s Dada, Alice Cooper brought producer Bob Ezrin back to run the console. Ezrin and Cooper had worked together on many of Cooper’s most commercially successful albums in the 70s, and by ’82 Ezrin himself was at something of a critical high water mark himself, owing in no small part to his work on

Album Review: Alice Cooper – Zipper Catches Skin

By 1981 Alice Cooper really had begun, thankfully, to flush the fashion (something he made an empty threat to do two years earlier). To the extent that Cooper had a formula, he was doing his best to move back toward it as the 1980s unfolded. After the creative disaster of 1981’s Special Forces, he co-produced

Album Review: Alice Cooper – Special Forces

As the 1970s ended, so did Alice Cooper‘s chart run. After an impressive string of hits beginning with 1971’s “I’m Eighteen (from the album Love it to Death) and more or less ending with Welcome to My Nightmare‘s ballad “Only Women Bleed” in 1975, the chart action pretty much dried up. There was the minor

Lord Sutch and Heavy Friends at 50

Scattered among the history of pop and rock music are the occasional oddities: albums made by those whose circumstances or talents in a particular area might not quite have suited them for the task of making an album, but who still somehow managed to do so. French millionaire playboy Philippe DeBarge did so in the

Rich Nelson: Seconding That Emotion

It’s not unknown for a creative artist to work in two very different media. But it’s remarkable when an artist achieves success in both. That’s what has happened in the case of Rich Nelson. Detroit-raised and living in Western North Carolina since 2005, Nelson is an acclaimed portraiture and landscape painter. He’s also an accomplished