Archive for the ‘review’ Category

Album Review: Mike Bloomfield, Al Kooper, Steve Stills – Super Session

Thursday, December 18th, 2014

In 1968, the concept of a “supergroup” was still fresh; Lillian Roxon even wrote about it – and its possibilities – in her Rock Encyclopedia. Al Kooper devised what became Super Session as a collaboration between him and guitarist Mike Bloomfield, late of Paul Butterfield Blues Band and Electric Flag. When the notoriously unreliable Bloomfield flaked halfway through the project, Kooper brought in Steve Stills to finish the album. Tasty (and generally tasteful) playing is all over the nine-track record. This release includes the long-delayed 5.1 mix version; Kooper’s liner notes tell the story. A sixties artifact everyone should hear.

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Album Review: Ian Hunter — Strings Attached

Thursday, December 18th, 2014

Hunter came to fame in the 1970s leading Mott the Hoople; he enjoyed a brief period of prominence again in the late 1970s as a solo artist. This 2CD set finds Hunter reinterpreting his own Mott and solo material within the context of a mostly-acoustic setting, aided by a lovely string orchestra. His raspy, well-worn voice melds surprisingly well with the high-toned classical trappings; the result is a warm and inviting set of songs. This reissue of a 2003 set is a delight; The Mott classic “Rest in Peace” seems to have been written to be performed in this manner.

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Album Review: Conte Candoli — Sincerely, Conte

Thursday, December 18th, 2014

This is a straight CD (and vinyl) reissue of a 1954 jazz date featuring the recorded headlining debut of trumpeter Conte Candoli (though curiously, the album cover – also a straight reproduction of the original – spells his first name wrong. Candoli leads an energetic quartet – lots of showy drum work here, courtesy Stan Levey – through an uptempo selection of tunes. Candoli and band are interpreters of the work of others; here you’ll find lively readings of numbers from the Gershwins along with other standards. It’s another high quality Bethlehem reissue from the Naxos folks; collect ‘em all!

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Album Reviews: Hugh Hopper — Memories and Frangloband

Thursday, December 18th, 2014

Bassist Hugh Hopper gained fame – or what passes for fame within the narrow confines of jazz-rock and progressive circles – as a member of Soft Machine. He passed away in 2009, and it happens, Hopper was apparently quite the busy guy. His estate is now involved in a good bit of closet-cleaning, and the results are being released on a ten-disc series. The first of these, Memories, is a survey of the material found on the second through tenth. It’s varied and interesting, though little of this music was intended for release. Frangloband documents some of Hopper’s last recordings.

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Album Review: Landmarq — Origins

Thursday, December 18th, 2014

It’s a bit of a head-scratcher when a collection like this crosses my desk: a retrospective of a band I’d never heard of. Origins is a career-spanning look at two distinct eras. The second (covered on the first disc) features a Clare Torry-sounding Tracy Hitchings fronting a band that sounds a bit like Spock’s Beard. The early material on the second disc features vocalist Damian Wilson. Only two members stuck around the whole time. Lots of Peter Bansk-ish keyboard work, which is always welcome in these parts. The D&D motif of the album is goofy, but the music is solid.

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Hundred Word Reviews: December 2014, Part 4

Thursday, December 18th, 2014

I’m working the pile down, even as more interesting titles show up on my desk. Here are five more brief (100 word) reviews of new music in a wide variety of styles. These titles are all reissue and/or archival releases.

There’s one more day’s worth of these hundred-word reviews, and then it’s on to some end-of-the-year features.

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Album Review: Wadada Leo Smith et. al. — Red Hill

Wednesday, December 17th, 2014

Lots of people I know – the ones who like jazz, anyway – tend to prefer Miles Davis‘ music best from the era around Birth of the Cool. Me, as a rock guy, I’m much more fascinated with the work he did around the time of Jack Johnson. And this avant jazz album from trumpeter Wadada Leo Smith sounds to these ears like that exploratory-era Miles, without John McLaughlin (or anyone, for that matter) on guitar. I can’t define this music much more sharply, but if you dig the musical references, you’ll quite likely appreciate the music on Red Hill.

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Album Review: Interstatic — Arise

Wednesday, December 17th, 2014

Jimmy Smith more or less invented the concept of organ trio. But it’s unlikely he had anything in mind like Interstatic. Imagine a bluesy, jazzy trio with Hammond, guitar and drums, playing unclassifiable instrumental music. The foundation is straight-ahead – not a lot of uncomfortable time signatures here – but the solid bottom end gives plenty of space for some expressive organ and guitar work. That said, “Caerbannog” is nearly as hard to follow as it is to pronounce. Strong ensemble playing means that everybody’s doing their own thing, but it all holds together, just. Challenging, and somehow still accessible.

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Album Review: Marbin — The Third Set

Wednesday, December 17th, 2014

Generally, I avoid reviewing more than one album by relatively unknown artists; even less often – never before, as far as I know – do I review two albums within the space of a year. But Marbin’s the real deal. Jazz-rock is a nearly meaningless term, so instead I might describe them as progressive rock band with jazz technique; they rock, and hard, but their precision is nothing short of stunning. And The Third Set is in fact a live album, combining studio production values with lots of feel and spontaneity. Dani Rabin‘s level of expression on guitar is stunning.

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Album Review: Lucas Lee — Normalcy Bias

Wednesday, December 17th, 2014

Some of those progressive drummers really get around; it seems as if Pat Mastelotto and Marco Minnemann are everywhere, and that they always involve themselves with fascinating projects. Pat’s the drummer here, but multi-instrumentalist Lucas Lee is the star of the show. He’s as skilled on classically-tinged piano as he is on menacingly distorted prog-metal guitar. The melodies are strong here, and the vocals (from the spoken news-chyron-esque “Justice Injustice” to the more conventional bits of singing on the remaining tracks) add a narrative element full of fear and paranoia to this mostly instrumental offering. It’s accessible without sacrificing ambition.

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